I Write The Music

Fascinating Rhythm – Great Hits Of The 1920s – Listen for Syncopation in this Music

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 13, 2018

 

 

 

 

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Franck: Violin Sonata / Mutter Orkis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 10, 2018

 

Published on Apr 6, 2017

S-VHS → PC 1st [0:27] 2nd [10:32] 3rd [14:58] 4th [22:18] Anne-Sophie Mutter [vn] Lambert Orkis [pf] 1989.12.9 Tokyo. Japan Live

 

 

Alma Deutsher: Piano improvisation

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 8, 2018

 

Published on Sep 8, 2017

Astonishing Piano improvisation by 12 year old Alma Deutsher for Alan Yentob for BBC imagine.
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Thursday Theory: Cadences

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 6, 2018

The Jazz Circle

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 6, 2018

THE PIANOS GUYS – One Direction – What Makes You Beautiful – – Time For Some Wild Fun! – 5 Piano Guys, 1 piano

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 5, 2018

 

Published on Jul 18, 2012

► Get our latest album “UNCHARTED” here: http://hubs.ly/H04ZSnT0
► WE’RE ON TOUR! http://goo.gl/fmybn0
► DOWNLOAD THIS SONG: http://goo.gl/6XXR6w
► GET TPG SHEET MUSIC: http://goo.gl/d2z7Uk ________________________
► Also Order “Uncharted” here:
► Listen to tracks from the new album “Uncharted” here:
► Apple Music – http://smarturl.it/Uncharted-am ________________________
*
ALL THE SOUNDS YOU HEAR WERE CREATED BY THE PIANO AND ONE CELLO BOW** (WITH SOME VOCALS AT THE END) STORY BEHIND THE SONG
The idea: A couple months ago the 5 of us were gathered round a piano prepping for a video shoot scheduled for that day.
We were brainstorming ideas when one of us (can’t remember who!) got off task and starting flicking a piano string.
Since all of us are poster children for ADHD, it wasn’t long before ALL of us had joined in — banging out a beat, plucking a string, or hitting keys.
The brainstorming meeting had been sabotaged beyond repair,
but another music video idea was born! The song: We went through several song possibilities before landing on “What Makes You Beautiful” by One Direction. We like this song because it’s catchy and the music, lyrics, and video passed our “sesame street” test
(meaning family friendly). We thought about the ramifications of taking on a teenybopper boy band tune as five middle-aged married guys who are desperately holding on to their hairlines. One of us even has a son older than the guys in One Direction (we won’t say who) 🙂 BUT you know us — we love a good challenge!
This one was so fun to write that the “challenge” part of it never was felt. We just acted like kids playing the piano and it totally worked! 🙂 After we figured out the main “techniques” of playing the piano unconventionally we loved experimenting with swapping out chords and throwing the structure of the song around until it clicked.
The location: Where to film? Fitting in video shoots between touring, writing, recording, editing, and spending time with family has always been a challenge. Let’s be honest, even getting all 5 of us in the same place at the same time has been a challenge! We had a big sold-out show at the Sandy, Utah Amphitheater.
We all determined to be at the show and film the video right on stage sometime between sound check and the performance. Sounds like a good idea right? Well…because of a lot of factors, including weather (we had a huge storm sweep in and knock everything down on stage during sound check) the only time we had to film was between the hours of 2AM – 7AM the morning of the concert. In the video at 2:30 you can see the morning light start breaking — we literally played into the sunrise! 🙂 Many thanks to the awesome guys at Annex Recording and Giles Reaves (engineer) for letting us record at their studio. Check them out at http://www.annexrecording.com Thanks to Sandy Amphitheater http://www.sandyarts.com/sandy-amphit…
or letting us film this video on their stage. They were so great to work with and we’ve performed so many times there the staff are all old friends (especially you, Mearle!) And thanks to Cole Adams, the lighting genius – who hung out all night allowing us to pull an all-nighter to film this. CREDITS “What Makes You Beautiful” written by Rami Yacoubm Carl Falk, and Savan Kotecha Published by KOBALT MUSIC PUB AMERICA OBO RAMI PRODUCTIONS, AIR CHRYSALIS SCANDINAVIA AB, EMI APRIL MUSIC INC OBO MR KANANI SONGS, EMI APRIL MUSIC INC Arrangement written and produced by Al van der Beek, Jon Schmidt, Steven Sharp Nelson, and Giles Reaves Performed by ThePianoGuys: Paul Anderson (videographer/video producer), Tel Stewart (videographer/editor), Al van der Beek (music producer), Jon Schmidt (pianist), Steven Sharp Nelson (cellist) Vocals: Al van der Beek, Steven Sharp Nelson, Jon Schmidt Piano recorded by Giles Reaves at Annex Recording Studios Additional Piano and vocals recorded by Al van der Beek at TPG Studios Mixed and Mastered by Al van der Beek at TPG Studios Video filmed on the stage of Sandy Amphitheatre in Sandy, Utah USA Lighting by Cole Adams Video produced by Paul Anderson and Tel Stewart Check more of our great videos!: Christina Perri – A Thousand Years (Piano/Cello Cover) – ThePianoGuys – https://youtu.be/QgaTQ5-XfMM Let It Go (Disney’s “Frozen”) Vivaldi’s Winter – ThePianoGuys – https://youtu.be/6Dakd7EIgBE Beethoven’s 5 Secrets – OneRepublic – ThePianoGuys – https://youtu.be/mJ_fkw5j-t0 Titanium / Pavane (Piano/Cello Cover) – David Guetta / Faure – ThePianoGuys – https://youtu.be/fz4MzJTeL0c

 

 

Score-Reading, Part 4C: – Beethoven’s 9th

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 5, 2018

 

Published on Dec 18, 2009

The final score recommended for study, Beethoven’s 9th Symphony.

Jazz Chord Voicings The 9 Different types you should know

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 4, 2018

 

 

Jazz Chord Voicings   –    The 9 Different types you should know

Published on Dec 18, 2017

Once you start having a vocabulary of Jazz Chords it becomes clear that there are many different ways to play any jazz chord on the guitar. For that reason it can be very useful to star working with different categories of chord voicings. If you have categories you have an idea of voicings that may work well together and you have an overview of the chords you know where you can also fill any gaps or chords you don’t already know. In this video I will go over 9 very common types of chord voicings that I use a lot when comping and playing chord melody. PDF available in the Patreon FB group! Drop2 voicings: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCQS2… 🔴 Subscribe for more free Jazz Guitar Lessons and Videos: https://bit.ly/JensLessons ☑️ Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/jenslarsen/ ✅DOWNLOAD A FREE E-BOOK with 15 II Valt I ign up for my newsletter:

 

 

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RAVEL – La Valse – Animated Music Score

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 30, 2018

 

Published on Jul 10, 2018

La valse, by Maurice Ravel, performed by the Boston Philharmonic Youth Orchestra under the direction of Benjamin Zander, with an animated graphical score. FAQ Q: When was this performed? A: The recording is from a May 6, 2018 performance, which was simulcast live. Here is a video of that performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nZsR… Q: Who else was involved in this project? A: Many people were involved, but I especially want to thank Etienne Abelin (who was instrumental in organizing the production of the animation), Lushen Wu (who synchronized the video in real time during the live performance), and Antonio Oliart Ros (who recorded the audio). Q: Where can I learn more about the performers and conductor? A: Here … https://www.bostonphil.org/about/bost… Q: Where can I learn more about the piece? A: As usual, here … https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_valse Q: I appreciate the animated graphical scores you make; how can I support your work? A: Thank you! The easiest way to support my work is by contributing via Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/musanim If you’d like to help in more specific way, consider this: http://www.musanim.com/underwriting Q: Could you please do a video of _______? A: Please see this: http://www.musanim.com/requests/

 

 

Celtic WomEn Concert – 2018

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 29, 2018

 

 

 

 

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DAVID FOSTER – Composer, Songwriter, Producer

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 25, 2018

 

 

 

 

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Popular Chord Progressions

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 24, 2018

 

 

 

Understanding Harmonic Rhythm

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 23, 2018

 

 

 

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Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 20, 2018

 

Published on Nov 6, 2011

Gran presentación de la Orquesta Filarmónica de Viena, conducida por el director ruso Valery Gergiev en [a mi juicio personal] una de las más grandes y magníficas interpretaciones del Pájaro de Fuego (L’Oiseau de feu) de Igor Stravinsky, que se tenga conocimiento, durante el Festival de Salzburgo 2000. Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000. (C) Deusche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited , Music Publishing Rights Collecting Society, UMPG Publishing and all their respective owners. There’s no personal work here. (C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

 

 

Most Beautiful Passages of Each Mahler Symphony

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 18, 2018

 

Published on Nov 12, 2016

Richard Atkinson chooses and analyzes a “most beautiful passage” from each of Mahler’s 9 symphonies. This is a fair use educational commentary that uses small excerpts from live recordings of Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra (Symphonies #1-7 and #9), Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic (Symphony #8), and Pierre Boulez at Bayreuth (Götterdämmerung excerpt). For best results, view this video full-screen and listen with good-quality headphones or speakers. All recordings used have been previously published on YouTube and time-indexed links to the chosen passages are provided below: Symphony #1: https://youtu.be/4XbHLFkg_Mw?t=41m42s Symphony #2: https://youtu.be/4MPuoOj5TIw?t=43m37s Symphony #3: https://youtu.be/9Yr720ftjaA?t=1h29m Symphony #4: https://youtu.be/YnfhInZLmUQ?t=44m25s Symphony #5: https://youtu.be/vOvXhyldUko?t=51m7s Symphony #6: https://youtu.be/YsEo1PsSmbg?t=33m3s Symphony #7: https://youtu.be/QdxvC7NNSLQ?t=11m25s Götterdämmerung: https://youtu.be/_ww4JHkloa8?t=3h30m45s Symphony #8: https://youtu.be/O5n4TbNMq1Q?t=1h15m27s Symphony #9: https://youtu.be/tkChdHBuoiQ?t=1h2m35s

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Classic Orchestration Manuals Online

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 18, 2018

 

Published on Oct 7, 2010

A look at classic orchestration manuals by Berlioz, Widor, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Forsyth, now available for free on IMSLP and Google Books. The Technique of the Modern Orchestra – Charles-Marie Widor http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Widor,… Refer under “T” Principles of Orchestration – Rimsky-Korsakov http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Rimsky… Refer under “P” Grand Treatise on Instrumentation and Modern Orchestration – Hector Berlioz/Richard Strauss http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Berlio… Refer under “G” Orchestration – Cecil Forsyth This book is now available in its entirety on Open Library: http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924… It has also been uploaded to IMSLP: http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Forsyt… Refer under “O” Choral Orchestration – Cecil Forsyth http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Forsyt… Refer under “C”

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OrchestrationOnline
Yes, but read the Piston first, or the Adler. You need a solid grounding in present-day understanding of how the orchestra works. Then build on that by examining other perspectives, including outdated ones like those I mention in this video. Don’t start with Forsyth or Berlioz.

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Clayton Young
What’s that at 2:20? Random guess: fantastic symphony (with I have yet to listen to).

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Andrew Wrangell Music
Thanks for going over these texts briefly- I might come back to them once I’ve finished reading my Adler book on orchestration. Thanks again!
OrchestrationOnline
Look. You should start with a contemporary text. That should be your baseline. I’ve already said, and I say it in the video: Adler or Piston (or both). Then, when you really really understand what the current thought is on orchestration, look at these older texts. You will be able to sift the irrelevant data, IF you take my advice and have a thorough grounding in what’s possible today, FIRST. Then the rest is easy.

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OrchestrationOnline
@carloselemesmo I don’t know it a Portuguese language translation was ever made, but if so I’m sure it is very rare. You can purchase copies in French with no problem, but it will cost a few Euros. Someday, I would love to update this precious manual myself and translate it into English.

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OrchestrationOnline
The Gould is good, but I use Kurt Stone’s book myself. As for the Stiller – that’s a bit hard to get ahold of, from what I understand – but still very informative, if not exhaustive.
OrchestrationOnline
@NedMcPhie I see the problem – YouTube changed their text protocols so that the end parentheses are no longer read in a hyperlink…duh! Also, every URL of IMSLP linking to an individual work now ends with an end parenthesis. I’ve updated the text so that it links to the composer pages (and then you can look up the manuals alphabetically), but this is pretty silly of both YouTube and IMSLP.

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OrchestrationOnline
@axellidenbrock Most American orchestration teachers, including myself, are fully aware of this book, and copies are in many conservatory libraries. Unfortunately, there is no English translation yet, and it is very expensive to purchase and import. Think of the practicalities – you are asking why a four-volume, exhaustive treatise is not well read in a country which speaks little French, and to which many shorter books in English are not just available, but assigned at university. That is why.

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OrchestrationOnline
@gentrytunes Areas of obsolescence: range and construction of instruments; technical limitations; wind key systems, especially as applied to shakes and trills; brass valve and trigger developments; overall viewpoint and philosophy; some notation rules for winds and brass; inclusion of outdated instruments; blind spots for authors in the music of other countries current to first publication; and other details. If your college book was too basic, get the Adler next. These books are no substitute.

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OrchestrationOnline
@axellidenbrock Gracias por tu comentario. I have great respect and appreciation for the music and musicians of Venezuela. I understand your question – and if I had the time, the skills, and a publisher, I would translate the Koechlin myself. It stands equal to any other orchestration text, and has many unique features. Please understand – we who teach orchestration all know about this book, and we use many of its teachings, even if we are not able to assign it due to the language barrier.

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OrchestrationOnline
@tonyvoid All due respect to Prof. Adler, I think it would take a whole separate book to cover the craft of crossover orchestration. I’ll be making a series on this soon – have been delaying while awaiting approval on a project which could be incorporated as part of the series.
OrchestrationOnline
@gerastiman The old orchestras of his time had a different style of playing, only preserved in later Soviet-era recordings. The brass would really go for it, hitting the cuivré button much of the time, while the string sections could be quite large, playing with a ferocious edge on crescendos. Winds could tend to a coarser tone, especially the double-reeds. The theaters in which they played were quite different from Western halls. Of course, that doesn’t mean you’re necessarily wrong…

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OrchestrationOnline
Good on you. Read the Piston first – it is clear, straightforward, and fast-moving. Then the Adler goes into enormous detail about everything, and has some good advice about scoring. It’s almost like Book 1 and Book 2.
OrchestrationOnline
@carloselemesmo I’ve seen copies for sale on the internet from time to time, sometimes for 30-40 Euros, sometimes 3-4X that much. You have to shop around. If your French is good, since you are studying in France, then you just need to read the university copies there, many many times I would say. Good luck with that, and I hope Dover publishes a translation someday.

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OrchestrationOnline
Finally, the whole reason for the divisi marking in the first place is that two or three (even four) notes may be played at once by a string instrument. Divisi lets the players know to divide rather than playing double or triple stops.
OrchestrationOnline
Well, you have to remember that the mid-19th century was the great era of instrument design and experimentation. He may have heard about the bass oboe, maybe even seen one, but felt that the instruments were not yet reliable enough or common enough for him to write into a score. Remember that he was a huge champion of the designs of Adolphe Sax, but seems to have rarely scored for saxophones, saxhorns, or other developments of the great Belgian.

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OrchestrationOnline
Yes – sorry, I misread the question as “9:05.”
OrchestrationOnline
I think you may have missed some of the important points that I make in my video. I ultimately stress the importance of having a contemporary text as a primary resource, like the Sam Adler or the Walter Piston. But I also underline the sense that historical perspectives are important for a broader understanding of orchestration – much of what is written in these texts has not changed, and appears nowhere else.

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OrchestrationOnline
@NedMcPhie Thanks for the heads-up, I will check these out and update soon.
OrchestrationOnline
It’s purely a dummy keyboard – I don’t even think about playability. But what’s great is that it weighs almost nothing, and it’s USB. I don’t know how available they are now, but 10 years ago every shop had them and they were dirt cheap. I bought that one for about $150 US. Anything with weighted keys is going to cost a lot more than that, and be much heavier – which for the purposes of note entry is unnecessary.

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OrchestrationOnline
@composingchef Good on you for buying the books! Dover is a righteous reprint company, and they could use the support. But not only that, you can thumb through the books rather than fiddling around with a screen. I own all of these myself, and prefer hard copy – but how nice that the starving composer-in-training does not have to give up eating lunch for a day in order to read one of these tomes. See you on the next video!

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OrchestrationOnline
As I’ve said a couple times before, Piston is the best book to start on. Then read the Adler when you know that you are going to have the time and take the subject more seriously (as in studying the subject professionally).
OrchestrationOnline
No, it’s the 88. I need 88 keys, I don’t want to fiddle with an octave button when I’m musically daydreaming.
OrchestrationOnline
Hi Israel – “divisi” is used only for strings, to let them know that two or more notes on one beat will be divided between members of the section. This is not used in winds or brass, which use a different system. The score should read whether both players are playing at once, or just the first or second (or third in the case of trumpets). Either “I”/”II”/”I&II” – or 1º/2º/a2 – or a mixture of the two. I myself use “I”/”II”/a2. Each player will receive a part with only their notes, plus cues.

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OrchestrationOnline
The Clarke is worth a look, but it’s more about workmanlike, basic arranging than it is a practical manual or guide to inspired orchestration. He does have some interesting insights about chord voicings and the harmonic series. Don’t ever think that any of what’s on IMSLP will substitute for Piston or Adler. They’re fascinating, but dated perspectives.
OrchestrationOnline
@gerastiman The old Russian orchestras, I mean! ha ha
OrchestrationOnline
As is the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Sound Exchange.
OrchestrationOnline
Also, in the case of two notes to a wind or brass part, the conductor would automatically know which player was playing which note. The top note is always given to the first player, and the lower note to the second player, unless otherwise indicated. Therefore, no need for a marking – it’s understood.
OrchestrationOnline
I’m sorry, but I don’t know what the problem is. None of my videos are blocked, and no one else is reporting problems. Maybe the problem is with your server. Please stop worrying about it, and try again tomorrow.

 

 

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Orchestration Lesson – Mahler, Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 17, 2018

 

 

Published on Apr 29, 2016

Analysis of Movement IV “Adagietto” of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony no. 5. Some essential thoughts about great string scoring. Please watch if you’ve registered to the upcoming MOOOC Term 1, because this is how it’s done. Information about Massive Open Online Orchestration Course Term 1: http://orchestrationonline.com/moooc/ Score available at: http://imslp.org/wiki/Symphony_No.5_(…) Support Orchestration Online on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/orchestration… Visit the official Orchestration Online website and subscribe to our newsletter. http://orchestrationonline.com Join the orchestration online community by subscribing to this channel, checking in on Twitter @OrchestrationOL, and being part of the conversation on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/27856…

 

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Take On Me – 2016 Remastered

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 16, 2018

 

Published on Mar 17, 2016

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Take On Me (2016 Remastered) · a-ha Time And Again: The Ultimate a-ha ℗ 1985 Warner Bros. Records. 2016 Remastered Rhino Entertainment Guitar: Paul Waaktaar-Savoy Keyboards: Magne Furuholmen Producer: Alan Tarney Vocals: Morten Harket Composer, Writer: Magne Furuholmen Composer, Writer: Morten Harket Composer, Writer: Pal Waaktaar Auto-generated by YouTube.

 

 

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Orchestra Library Walkthrough and Unique Features in Iconica | Orchestra library for HALion

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 13, 2018

 

Published on Jun 27, 2018

Get a general overview of Iconica Sections & Players, and learn how you work with key switches, the tuning scale and round robin controls. We will also show you how to create multi-patches for a huge and ready-to-use sound. Iconica is a HALion library which can be used with the free HALion Sonic SE plug-in (VST, AAX, AU) or with HALion Sonic SE 3 and HALion 6. Learn more about Iconica Sections & Players or check out the trial at: https://steinberg.net/iconica Library Navigation : 1:00 Tuning Scales: 8:12 Mic Positions : 8:21 Creating Multi Patches : 9:45 VST Note Expression: 13:24 VST Expression Maps: 16:02 We hope you find this video entertaining and useful. If you like what you see, please leave a comment and tell us what you think. Thank you. Your Steinberg YouTube Team Check out the trial version of HALion and lay hands on the exciting features HALion has to offer: https://www.steinberg.net/en/products… Get more detailed information on VST from our website: https://www.steinberg.net/vst Buy VST instruments and effects in the Steinberg Online Shop: https://www.steinberg.net/en/shop/vst… Whether you require assistance with registration and activation/re-activation through our support forums and Knowledge Base support articles or simply want to read the latest support news, you can find all information in one place: https://helpcenter.steinberg.de Also make sure to… Like our Facebook page and stay informed on insights, news, announcements and updates, events and live streams. Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/steinberg Subscribe to our dedicated VST YouTube channel and learn the ropes of using VST products by watching practical video tutorials and other interesting features: https://www.youtube.com/VST_virtual_s… On Twitter, stay up to date with latest news, updates and special offers anytime and anywhere: https://twitter.com/steinbergmedia Follow us on Instagram for full picture coverage on launch events, trade shows and other exciting occasions: https://www.instagram.com/steinbergmedia Check out our SoundCloud profile and listen to the many demo tracks we’ve got listed there: https://soundcloud.com/steinbergmedia

 

 

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MOZART – Symphony No. 40 Gm – K 550 – 1. Molto Allegro

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 13, 2018

 

Published on Aug 11, 2008

Anzor Kinkladze Georgian SIMI Festival Orchestra 1998 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

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