I Write The Music

Debussy – 3 Nocturnes for Orchestra (Color-Coded Analysis)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 13, 2018

 

Published on Jan 1, 2012
(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels) Claude Debussy – Nocturnes, L.91 1.Nuages (Clouds) @0:00 2.Fêtes (Festivals) @6:15 3.Sirènes (Sirens) @12:43 Boulez, Cleveland, 2nd recording Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer. For more videos of this type see: Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX): http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…
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A special role is allotted to the English horn in “Nuages” (Clouds), the first piece of the group. Thin, two-voice counterpoint in steady quarter notes provides a background for the English horn’s rather plaintive gesture. The same melodic fragment is repeated several times with very little alteration or extension, interrupted occasionally by comments from the French horn section. A stark contrast is provided by a pentatonic interlude, scored for flute and harp against a sustained chordal background and marked “Un peu animé.”
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The English horn raises its quiet voice again, only to dissolve against the pianissimo tremolo background as the flute takes up its melody one more time. The quietly pulsating pizzicati of “Nuages” conclusion provide a sense of “grey agony,” as Debussy put it. “Fêtes” (Festivals) will be friendly ground to any listener familiar with the final movement of Respighi’s 1929 work along the same lines, Feste Romane. The juxtaposition of a forceful, even percussive, rhythmic ostinato in 12/8 time with the earthy tune of the brass band (representing the Garde Républicaine) provides for the same kind of multi-textural feel that Respighi would exploit even further three decades later.
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Through sheer repetition the music builds to several swaggering climaxes, only to be deflated each time and have to begin the process all over again. The music trails away into nothingness as the brass band finally completes its journey through the heart of the celebration. Remarkable about “Fêtes” is Debussy’s ability to hint at raunchiness and vulgarity within the context of his own extremely refined soundworld. A vocalizing (i.e., textless) women’s chorus is added to the ensemble for “Sirènes,” the last, and in many ways the most evocative of the Nocturnes.
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One must not be misled by “Sirènes” repetitiveness and apparent simplicity—a simplicity meant to parallel the deceptively innocent charm of the mythological sea sirens—for here is a work of great subtlety indeed. The dense intricacy of the orchestral effects contained throughout the piece, set almost exclusively at a piano or pianissimo dynamic indication, has reminded more than one listener of the techniques of that most accomplished of orchestrators, Maurice Ravel. Debussy’s methods, however, are entirely his own. Not surprisingly, the music drifts away into the sea, floating upon the few sparse harmonics of the two harpists. © All Music Guide

 

 

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Beethoven 5th Symphony – Analysis by Gerard Schwarz

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on September 12, 2018

 

Published on Jun 11, 2014

Most Beautiful Passages of Each Mahler Symphony

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 18, 2018

 

Published on Nov 12, 2016

Richard Atkinson chooses and analyzes a “most beautiful passage” from each of Mahler’s 9 symphonies. This is a fair use educational commentary that uses small excerpts from live recordings of Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra (Symphonies #1-7 and #9), Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic (Symphony #8), and Pierre Boulez at Bayreuth (Götterdämmerung excerpt). For best results, view this video full-screen and listen with good-quality headphones or speakers. All recordings used have been previously published on YouTube and time-indexed links to the chosen passages are provided below: Symphony #1: https://youtu.be/4XbHLFkg_Mw?t=41m42s Symphony #2: https://youtu.be/4MPuoOj5TIw?t=43m37s Symphony #3: https://youtu.be/9Yr720ftjaA?t=1h29m Symphony #4: https://youtu.be/YnfhInZLmUQ?t=44m25s Symphony #5: https://youtu.be/vOvXhyldUko?t=51m7s Symphony #6: https://youtu.be/YsEo1PsSmbg?t=33m3s Symphony #7: https://youtu.be/QdxvC7NNSLQ?t=11m25s Götterdämmerung: https://youtu.be/_ww4JHkloa8?t=3h30m45s Symphony #8: https://youtu.be/O5n4TbNMq1Q?t=1h15m27s Symphony #9: https://youtu.be/tkChdHBuoiQ?t=1h2m35s

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Orchestration Lesson – Mahler, Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 17, 2018

 

 

Published on Apr 29, 2016

Analysis of Movement IV “Adagietto” of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony no. 5. Some essential thoughts about great string scoring. Please watch if you’ve registered to the upcoming MOOOC Term 1, because this is how it’s done. Information about Massive Open Online Orchestration Course Term 1: http://orchestrationonline.com/moooc/ Score available at: http://imslp.org/wiki/Symphony_No.5_(…) Support Orchestration Online on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/orchestration… Visit the official Orchestration Online website and subscribe to our newsletter. http://orchestrationonline.com Join the orchestration online community by subscribing to this channel, checking in on Twitter @OrchestrationOL, and being part of the conversation on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/27856…

 

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Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody 2 – Music Animation Machine

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 4, 2018

 

Score

 

OPYCLEID updates (2)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on May 5, 2018

I have a just released a major version change

of my Python package OPYCLEID

for transformational music analysis.

The library is available on GitHub,

and is also registered on PyPi

(which means it can be installed very quickly with pip).

As the library has grown in size and complexity,

I also spent some time on writing .

via OPYCLEID updates (2) — alpof

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AMADEUS MOZART – Linz Symphony , Mozart, Symphony No. 36

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 9, 2018

 

 

Mozart Piano Sonata, K. 331, third movement, “Alla Turca,“ – Music analysis / music appreciation

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 2, 2018

Published on Nov 11, 2014

This video analyzes and explains important musical characteristics of the third movement of Mozart’s Piano Sonata in A Major, K. 331, “Alla Turca,” including its structure and themes. A piano performance is also included.

 

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Hit Songs Deconstructed at Berklee College of Music – Top 10 Deconstructed

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 1, 2018

 

Published on Dec 9, 2015

In this video excerpt from a lecture at Berklee College of Music, David Penn, Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Hit Songs Deconstructed, discusses some of the most effective contemporary songwriting techniques. Focusing on songs that landed in the Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 during the second quarter of 2015, trending techniques are illustrated through graphs, charts and audio examples.

 

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Beethoven, Symphony 9, 2nd movement (complete), Molto vivace, Philharmonia Baroque – Music Animation Analysis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on January 11, 2018

Published on Jan 17, 2011
Philharmonia Baroque playing the second movement (molto vivace) of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, accompanied by a scrolling bar-graph score. FAQ Q: I appreciate the animated graphical scores you make; how can I support your work? A: Thank you! The easiest way to support my work is by contributing via Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/musanim If you’d like to help in more specific way, consider this: http://www.musanim.com/underwriting Q: Where can I get this recording? A: Here: http://philharmonia.org/shop/#beethoven Q: Who is conducting? A: Nicholas McGegan.

Why We Analyse Music | Julian Horton

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on August 29, 2017

 

Society for Music Analysis 

Published on Feb 23, 2016

Professor Julian Horton opens up a dialogue between music analysis and musicology, exploring ways in which motivic and formal analysis can reflect and interact with broader historical issues.

Looking in detail at the exposition in movement one of Brahms’ Symphony No. 1, Op. 68, we will investigate the relationship between functions in a sonata form and the dense network of motivic counterpoint from which they are constructed. This will then be contextualised with late-nineteenth-century debates about the appropriate mode of expression in a symphony, especially the Wagnerian view that Brahms had wrongly imported a domestic, chamber-musical style into a public genre.

For additional content, including recommended recordings, suggested reading and music examples, see http://www.sma.ac.uk/videos/episode-1/.

_____

Presented by Julian Horton
Directed by Neil Neenan (@neilneenan)
Produced by Kirstie Hewlett (@kirstie_hewlett)

 

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Beethoven – Piano Sonata 23, Op.57 “Appassionata” (Color-Coded Analysis V2)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 25, 2017

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The Daily Beethoven

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(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels)

Piano Sonata No.23 in Fm, Op.57 (‘Appassionata’)
1.Allegro assai @0:00
2.Andante con moto (attaca) @9:06
3.Allegro ma non troppo @15:33

Piano: Annie Fischer

(Version with Alfred Brendel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89hcfg…)

Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer.

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…

Introduction to Sonata Form:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/abou…

This analysis was assisted in large part by Donald Tovey’s “Companion to Beethoven’s Pianoforte Sonatas”.

My Analysis Cheat Sheet:
-SONATA FORM: Most common form, almost always in the 1st movement and often last movement of a work. The basic sequence is Intro, Exposition, Development, Recapitulation and Coda.
-EXPOSITION: Main theme(s) are presented, usually in the home key and then a modulated key
-THEME / THEME GROUP: musical “paragraph”. These can be broken down into 1 or more “tunes”. These are grouped according to key and end on cadences. The 1st Theme Group is in the home key. The 2nd Theme Group is in the dominant or other key.
-CLOSING/CADENCE SECTION: a theme group which closes the Expo or Recap (it follows the 2nd theme) and revives Theme 1 to provide closure.
-MODULATING BRIDGE/TRANSITION: material to get from 1 key/theme group to another, often w sequencing.
-DEVELOPMENT: free-form “working out”/”fantasia” section where earlier themes are subjected to variations and atomizations. Possibly a new theme is introduced (“Eroica”).
-RECAPITULATION: Repeat of the Expo, except that this section remains in the same key throughout and there can be theme variations from the initial Expo versions of themes.
-CODA: Follows the Recap, kind of a second development designed to finish off the work.
-SEQUENCING: repeating a phrase on different starting notes (keys)
-TERNARY FORM: 3-part form in A-B-A, usually a Scherzo or Minuet
-SCHERZO/MINUET: 1st pt. of a 3-pt. Scherzo form, usually AA.BA’.BA’ in 3/4 time. Lively.
-TRIO: Middle section of a Scherzo movement, slower, broader than the Scherzo section
-RONDO: Similar to Sonata form except that the Development is replaced by a new section and there is less transition material. A principal theme (A) alternates with contrasting themes (BCD…). (Ex.ABACABA.)
-FUGUE: form in which a subject(s) undergoes canonical permutations
-VARIATION: repeat of a theme with variation
-CADENZA: unaccompanied instrumental solo
-BINARY FORM: Structure in AB. 2-Part Song form.
(Disclaimer: I do not have a music degree, all of the above is purely from memory and observation)

 

Beethoven – Symphony 9, Op.125 – Color-Coded Analysis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 27, 2017

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(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels)

I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso @0:00
II. Scherzo: Molto vivace – Presto @14:38
III. Adagio molto e cantabile @27:07
IV. Presto; Allegro molto assai (Alla marcia); Andante maestoso; Allegro energico, sempre ben marcato. @39:40 (Choral Section @44:54)

Conducted by Rene Leibowitz / Royal Philharmonic

Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer.

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…

Introduction to Sonata Form:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/abou…

Arrangement for Electric Rock Band:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnaOX-…

My Analysis Cheat Sheet:
-SONATA FORM: Most common form, almost always in the 1st movement and often last movement of a work. The basic sequence is Intro, Exposition, Development, Recapitulation and Coda.
-EXPOSITION: Main theme(s) are presented, usually in the home key and then a modulated key
-THEME / THEME GROUP: musical “paragraph”. These can be broken down into 1 or more “tunes”. These are grouped according to key and end on cadences. The 1st Theme Group is in the home key. The 2nd Theme Group is in the dominant or other key.
-CLOSING/CADENCE SECTION: a theme group which closes the Expo or Recap (it follows the 2nd theme) and revives Theme 1 to provide closure.
-MODULATING BRIDGE/TRANSITION: material to get from 1 key/theme group to another, often w sequencing.
-DEVELOPMENT: free-form “working out”/”fantasia” section where earlier themes are subjected to variations and atomizations. Possibly a new theme is introduced (“Eroica”).
-RECAPITULATION: Repeat of the Expo, except that this section remains in the same key throughout and there can be theme variations from the initial Expo versions of themes.
-CODA: Follows the Recap, kind of a second development designed to finish off the work.
-SEQUENCING: repeating a phrase on different starting notes (keys)
-TERNARY FORM: 3-part form in A-B-A, usually a Scherzo or Minuet
-SCHERZO/MINUET: 1st pt. of a 3-pt. Scherzo form, usually AA.BA’.BA’ in 3/4 time. Lively.
-TRIO: Middle section of a Scherzo movement, slower, broader than the Scherzo section
-RONDO: Similar to Sonata form except that the Development is replaced by a new section and there is less transition material. A principal theme (A) alternates with contrasting themes (BCD…). (Ex.ABACABA.)
-FUGUE: form in which a subject(s) undergoes canonical permutations
-VARIATION: repeat of a theme with variation
-CADENZA: unaccompanied instrumental solo
-BINARY FORM: Structure in AB. 2-Part Song form.
(Disclaimer: I do not have a music degree, all of the above is purely from memory and observation)

Symphony 9, Op.125
1st Mvmt (Dm):
Expo:
– Introduction
– Th.1 1st Time (Dm)
– Th.1 2nd Time (Bb)
– Th.2 Pt 1 (Bb)
– Th.2 Pt 2
– Th.2 Pt 3
– Closing Pt 1 (Bb)
– Closing Pt 2
Development (Dm)
– Pt 1
– Pt 2
Recapitulation:
– Th.1 (D) (with crazy Timpani Rolls)
– Th.2 Pt 1
– Th.2 Pt 2
– Th.2 Pt 3
– Closing Pt 1 (Bb)
– Closing Pt 2
Coda

2nd Mvmt (Dm)
A:
– Introduction (short)
– Th.1 (Dm)
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
A:
– Th.1 (Dm)
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
B
C:
– Th.1
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
B
C:
– Th.1
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
Coda 1

Trio (D)
– Pt 1
– Pt 2

A:
– Introduction (short)
– Th.1 (Dm)
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
B
C:
– Th.1
– Th.2 (C)
– Closing (C)
– Coda 2

3rd Mvmt (Bb)
Introduction (brief)
Th.1
Th.2
Th.1, Var 1
Th.2
Th 1 Var 2
Th 1 Var 3
(tutti phrase)
(tutti phrase developed)
Coda

4th Mvmt (Dm)
Introduction (Recitando Quasi Fantasia):
– Fanfare & Recitative 1st Time
– Fanfare & Recitative 2nd Time
– Recall M1
– Recitative
– Recall M2
– Recitative
– Recall M3
– Recitative
– Foreshadow Th.1 & Recitative
– Main Th.
– Th.Var 1
– Th.Var 2
– Th.Tutti

Choral Section
Th.1 Pt 1
Th.1 Pt 2
March var. (Bb)
Orchestral Fuge
Th.1 (reprise)
Th.2 (G)
– Plainchant
– Choral
– Plainchant
– Development
Fugato of Th1 & 2 (D)
ascending sequence
Development (Th.1)
Cadenza 1 (D)
Cadenza 2 (B)
Coda (D)

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Beethoven – Symphony 2, Op.36 (Color-Coded Analysis)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 18, 2016

Beethoven – Piano Sonata 29, Op.106 “Hammerklavier” (Color-Coded Analysis)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 19, 2016

Tchaikowsky: Waltz of the Flowers Harmonic Analysis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 11, 2016
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Harmonic Analysis – Wagner’s Prelude to Tristan und Isolde, Act I

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 10, 2016
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Avery, Allegro Spiritoso – Music Analysis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on February 15, 2016
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Don Glanden – Analysis of Chick Corea’s Solo – 500 Hundred Miles High

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on February 11, 2016
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Debussy – 3 Nocturnes for Orchestra – Color-Coded Analysis

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on January 15, 2016
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