I Write The Music

Most Beautiful Passages of Each Mahler Symphony

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 18, 2018

 

Published on Nov 12, 2016

Richard Atkinson chooses and analyzes a “most beautiful passage” from each of Mahler’s 9 symphonies. This is a fair use educational commentary that uses small excerpts from live recordings of Claudio Abbado and the Lucerne Festival Orchestra (Symphonies #1-7 and #9), Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic (Symphony #8), and Pierre Boulez at Bayreuth (Götterdämmerung excerpt). For best results, view this video full-screen and listen with good-quality headphones or speakers. All recordings used have been previously published on YouTube and time-indexed links to the chosen passages are provided below: Symphony #1: https://youtu.be/4XbHLFkg_Mw?t=41m42s Symphony #2: https://youtu.be/4MPuoOj5TIw?t=43m37s Symphony #3: https://youtu.be/9Yr720ftjaA?t=1h29m Symphony #4: https://youtu.be/YnfhInZLmUQ?t=44m25s Symphony #5: https://youtu.be/vOvXhyldUko?t=51m7s Symphony #6: https://youtu.be/YsEo1PsSmbg?t=33m3s Symphony #7: https://youtu.be/QdxvC7NNSLQ?t=11m25s Götterdämmerung: https://youtu.be/_ww4JHkloa8?t=3h30m45s Symphony #8: https://youtu.be/O5n4TbNMq1Q?t=1h15m27s Symphony #9: https://youtu.be/tkChdHBuoiQ?t=1h2m35s

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Tagged with: ,

Classic Orchestration Manuals Online

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 18, 2018

 

Published on Oct 7, 2010

A look at classic orchestration manuals by Berlioz, Widor, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Forsyth, now available for free on IMSLP and Google Books. The Technique of the Modern Orchestra – Charles-Marie Widor http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Widor,… Refer under “T” Principles of Orchestration – Rimsky-Korsakov http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Rimsky… Refer under “P” Grand Treatise on Instrumentation and Modern Orchestration – Hector Berlioz/Richard Strauss http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Berlio… Refer under “G” Orchestration – Cecil Forsyth This book is now available in its entirety on Open Library: http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924… It has also been uploaded to IMSLP: http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Forsyt… Refer under “O” Choral Orchestration – Cecil Forsyth http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Forsyt… Refer under “C”

SHOW LESS

OrchestrationOnline
Yes, but read the Piston first, or the Adler. You need a solid grounding in present-day understanding of how the orchestra works. Then build on that by examining other perspectives, including outdated ones like those I mention in this video. Don’t start with Forsyth or Berlioz.

4

View reply
Clayton Young
What’s that at 2:20? Random guess: fantastic symphony (with I have yet to listen to).

2

View reply
Andrew Wrangell Music
Thanks for going over these texts briefly- I might come back to them once I’ve finished reading my Adler book on orchestration. Thanks again!
OrchestrationOnline
Look. You should start with a contemporary text. That should be your baseline. I’ve already said, and I say it in the video: Adler or Piston (or both). Then, when you really really understand what the current thought is on orchestration, look at these older texts. You will be able to sift the irrelevant data, IF you take my advice and have a thorough grounding in what’s possible today, FIRST. Then the rest is easy.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@carloselemesmo I don’t know it a Portuguese language translation was ever made, but if so I’m sure it is very rare. You can purchase copies in French with no problem, but it will cost a few Euros. Someday, I would love to update this precious manual myself and translate it into English.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
The Gould is good, but I use Kurt Stone’s book myself. As for the Stiller – that’s a bit hard to get ahold of, from what I understand – but still very informative, if not exhaustive.
OrchestrationOnline
@NedMcPhie I see the problem – YouTube changed their text protocols so that the end parentheses are no longer read in a hyperlink…duh! Also, every URL of IMSLP linking to an individual work now ends with an end parenthesis. I’ve updated the text so that it links to the composer pages (and then you can look up the manuals alphabetically), but this is pretty silly of both YouTube and IMSLP.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@axellidenbrock Most American orchestration teachers, including myself, are fully aware of this book, and copies are in many conservatory libraries. Unfortunately, there is no English translation yet, and it is very expensive to purchase and import. Think of the practicalities – you are asking why a four-volume, exhaustive treatise is not well read in a country which speaks little French, and to which many shorter books in English are not just available, but assigned at university. That is why.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@gentrytunes Areas of obsolescence: range and construction of instruments; technical limitations; wind key systems, especially as applied to shakes and trills; brass valve and trigger developments; overall viewpoint and philosophy; some notation rules for winds and brass; inclusion of outdated instruments; blind spots for authors in the music of other countries current to first publication; and other details. If your college book was too basic, get the Adler next. These books are no substitute.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@axellidenbrock Gracias por tu comentario. I have great respect and appreciation for the music and musicians of Venezuela. I understand your question – and if I had the time, the skills, and a publisher, I would translate the Koechlin myself. It stands equal to any other orchestration text, and has many unique features. Please understand – we who teach orchestration all know about this book, and we use many of its teachings, even if we are not able to assign it due to the language barrier.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@tonyvoid All due respect to Prof. Adler, I think it would take a whole separate book to cover the craft of crossover orchestration. I’ll be making a series on this soon – have been delaying while awaiting approval on a project which could be incorporated as part of the series.
OrchestrationOnline
@gerastiman The old orchestras of his time had a different style of playing, only preserved in later Soviet-era recordings. The brass would really go for it, hitting the cuivré button much of the time, while the string sections could be quite large, playing with a ferocious edge on crescendos. Winds could tend to a coarser tone, especially the double-reeds. The theaters in which they played were quite different from Western halls. Of course, that doesn’t mean you’re necessarily wrong…

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
Good on you. Read the Piston first – it is clear, straightforward, and fast-moving. Then the Adler goes into enormous detail about everything, and has some good advice about scoring. It’s almost like Book 1 and Book 2.
OrchestrationOnline
@carloselemesmo I’ve seen copies for sale on the internet from time to time, sometimes for 30-40 Euros, sometimes 3-4X that much. You have to shop around. If your French is good, since you are studying in France, then you just need to read the university copies there, many many times I would say. Good luck with that, and I hope Dover publishes a translation someday.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
Finally, the whole reason for the divisi marking in the first place is that two or three (even four) notes may be played at once by a string instrument. Divisi lets the players know to divide rather than playing double or triple stops.
OrchestrationOnline
Well, you have to remember that the mid-19th century was the great era of instrument design and experimentation. He may have heard about the bass oboe, maybe even seen one, but felt that the instruments were not yet reliable enough or common enough for him to write into a score. Remember that he was a huge champion of the designs of Adolphe Sax, but seems to have rarely scored for saxophones, saxhorns, or other developments of the great Belgian.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
Yes – sorry, I misread the question as “9:05.”
OrchestrationOnline
I think you may have missed some of the important points that I make in my video. I ultimately stress the importance of having a contemporary text as a primary resource, like the Sam Adler or the Walter Piston. But I also underline the sense that historical perspectives are important for a broader understanding of orchestration – much of what is written in these texts has not changed, and appears nowhere else.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@NedMcPhie Thanks for the heads-up, I will check these out and update soon.
OrchestrationOnline
It’s purely a dummy keyboard – I don’t even think about playability. But what’s great is that it weighs almost nothing, and it’s USB. I don’t know how available they are now, but 10 years ago every shop had them and they were dirt cheap. I bought that one for about $150 US. Anything with weighted keys is going to cost a lot more than that, and be much heavier – which for the purposes of note entry is unnecessary.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
@composingchef Good on you for buying the books! Dover is a righteous reprint company, and they could use the support. But not only that, you can thumb through the books rather than fiddling around with a screen. I own all of these myself, and prefer hard copy – but how nice that the starving composer-in-training does not have to give up eating lunch for a day in order to read one of these tomes. See you on the next video!

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
As I’ve said a couple times before, Piston is the best book to start on. Then read the Adler when you know that you are going to have the time and take the subject more seriously (as in studying the subject professionally).
OrchestrationOnline
No, it’s the 88. I need 88 keys, I don’t want to fiddle with an octave button when I’m musically daydreaming.
OrchestrationOnline
Hi Israel – “divisi” is used only for strings, to let them know that two or more notes on one beat will be divided between members of the section. This is not used in winds or brass, which use a different system. The score should read whether both players are playing at once, or just the first or second (or third in the case of trumpets). Either “I”/”II”/”I&II” – or 1º/2º/a2 – or a mixture of the two. I myself use “I”/”II”/a2. Each player will receive a part with only their notes, plus cues.

Read more

OrchestrationOnline
The Clarke is worth a look, but it’s more about workmanlike, basic arranging than it is a practical manual or guide to inspired orchestration. He does have some interesting insights about chord voicings and the harmonic series. Don’t ever think that any of what’s on IMSLP will substitute for Piston or Adler. They’re fascinating, but dated perspectives.
OrchestrationOnline
@gerastiman The old Russian orchestras, I mean! ha ha
OrchestrationOnline
As is the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Sound Exchange.
OrchestrationOnline
Also, in the case of two notes to a wind or brass part, the conductor would automatically know which player was playing which note. The top note is always given to the first player, and the lower note to the second player, unless otherwise indicated. Therefore, no need for a marking – it’s understood.
OrchestrationOnline
I’m sorry, but I don’t know what the problem is. None of my videos are blocked, and no one else is reporting problems. Maybe the problem is with your server. Please stop worrying about it, and try again tomorrow.

 

 

Tagged with:

Orchestration Lesson – Mahler, Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 17, 2018

 

 

Published on Apr 29, 2016

Analysis of Movement IV “Adagietto” of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony no. 5. Some essential thoughts about great string scoring. Please watch if you’ve registered to the upcoming MOOOC Term 1, because this is how it’s done. Information about Massive Open Online Orchestration Course Term 1: http://orchestrationonline.com/moooc/ Score available at: http://imslp.org/wiki/Symphony_No.5_(…) Support Orchestration Online on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/orchestration… Visit the official Orchestration Online website and subscribe to our newsletter. http://orchestrationonline.com Join the orchestration online community by subscribing to this channel, checking in on Twitter @OrchestrationOL, and being part of the conversation on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/27856…

 

Tagged with: ,

Take On Me – 2016 Remastered

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 16, 2018

 

Published on Mar 17, 2016

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Take On Me (2016 Remastered) · a-ha Time And Again: The Ultimate a-ha ℗ 1985 Warner Bros. Records. 2016 Remastered Rhino Entertainment Guitar: Paul Waaktaar-Savoy Keyboards: Magne Furuholmen Producer: Alan Tarney Vocals: Morten Harket Composer, Writer: Magne Furuholmen Composer, Writer: Morten Harket Composer, Writer: Pal Waaktaar Auto-generated by YouTube.

 

 

Tagged with: ,

Orchestra Library Walkthrough and Unique Features in Iconica | Orchestra library for HALion

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 13, 2018

 

Published on Jun 27, 2018

Get a general overview of Iconica Sections & Players, and learn how you work with key switches, the tuning scale and round robin controls. We will also show you how to create multi-patches for a huge and ready-to-use sound. Iconica is a HALion library which can be used with the free HALion Sonic SE plug-in (VST, AAX, AU) or with HALion Sonic SE 3 and HALion 6. Learn more about Iconica Sections & Players or check out the trial at: https://steinberg.net/iconica Library Navigation : 1:00 Tuning Scales: 8:12 Mic Positions : 8:21 Creating Multi Patches : 9:45 VST Note Expression: 13:24 VST Expression Maps: 16:02 We hope you find this video entertaining and useful. If you like what you see, please leave a comment and tell us what you think. Thank you. Your Steinberg YouTube Team Check out the trial version of HALion and lay hands on the exciting features HALion has to offer: https://www.steinberg.net/en/products… Get more detailed information on VST from our website: https://www.steinberg.net/vst Buy VST instruments and effects in the Steinberg Online Shop: https://www.steinberg.net/en/shop/vst… Whether you require assistance with registration and activation/re-activation through our support forums and Knowledge Base support articles or simply want to read the latest support news, you can find all information in one place: https://helpcenter.steinberg.de Also make sure to… Like our Facebook page and stay informed on insights, news, announcements and updates, events and live streams. Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/steinberg Subscribe to our dedicated VST YouTube channel and learn the ropes of using VST products by watching practical video tutorials and other interesting features: https://www.youtube.com/VST_virtual_s… On Twitter, stay up to date with latest news, updates and special offers anytime and anywhere: https://twitter.com/steinbergmedia Follow us on Instagram for full picture coverage on launch events, trade shows and other exciting occasions: https://www.instagram.com/steinbergmedia Check out our SoundCloud profile and listen to the many demo tracks we’ve got listed there: https://soundcloud.com/steinbergmedia

 

 

Tagged with:

MOZART – Symphony No. 40 Gm – K 550 – 1. Molto Allegro

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 13, 2018

 

Published on Aug 11, 2008

Anzor Kinkladze Georgian SIMI Festival Orchestra 1998 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Tagged with: ,

Song of the Earth – Voyager Space Sounds – 3-24-13

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 12, 2018

 

Published on Mar 24, 2013

 

Tagged with:

Understanding Music Form

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 10, 2018

 

 

 

Tagged with:

Electric Bass Guitar Solos

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 9, 2018

 

 

 

Tagged with:

Obit: Cecil Taylor — Hawkins Bay Dispatch — Hipster Sanctuary

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 8, 2018

 

 

https://youtu.be/3oiJMXAgZR0

Jazz pianist with a radical improvisation style described as one of the most ‘incorrigibly sublime’ figures in the recent history of music 08 April 2018 |John Fordham | The Guardian “The maverick African-American jazz pianist and poet Cecil Taylor, who has died aged 89, gave an impression of constant motion and restless speed. He fused […]

via Obit: Cecil Taylor — Hawkins Bay Dispatch — Hipster Sanctuary

Tagged with: ,

Happy July 4th!

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 4, 2018

 

 

 

Tagged with: ,

The Modern Jazz Sextet feat. Dizzy Gillespie

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 4, 2018

 

 

 

Tagged with:

CUBAN PIANO MASTER

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 29, 2018

 

Published on Apr 25, 2008

Musica cubana tradicional (salsa). Homenaje a Elio Reve, fallecido musico cubano.Salsa Dance,Timba y Rumba
Tagged with: ,

Rachmaninoff – Étude-Tableaux Op. 39 No. 5 (Kissin)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 28, 2018

Published on Jan 31, 2016

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Étude-Tableaux, Op. 39 No. 5 in E-flat minor Piano: Evgeny Kissin

 

 

Tagged with: , , ,

Steel Drum – UB40 Red Red Wine by Dano’s Island Sounds

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 27, 2018

 

Published on Mar 5, 2014

Download full version of “Red Red Wine” here: https://danosislandsounds.com/music/i… Download full version of “Red Red Wine” at iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/da… Music video by Dan Lancelot of Dano’s Island Sounds. Tenor steel drum version of “Red Red Wine” Produced by: Hug It Out Productions Hire Dano’s Island Sounds Today http://danosislandsounds.com/

 

Tagged with:

György Ligeti – Six Bagatelles, CARION, 2014

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 24, 2018

 

Published on Jan 28, 2014

Ligeti’s Six Bagatelles is Carion’s signature piece since 2004. It perfectly demonstrates Danish ensembles unique performance style – movement and elements of choreography. https://www.facebook.com/carion see also our video of Nielsen’s Quintet op. 43 – http://youtu.be/Ow0sYQH-8HQ http://www.carion.dk György Ligeti ( 1923-2006), Six Bagatelles for Woodwind Quintet I. Allegro con spirito II. Rubato. Lamentoso III. Allegro grazioso IV. Presto ruvido V. Adagio. Mesto — Belá Bartók in memoriam VI. Molto vivace. Capriccioso CARION: Dora Seres, flute Egils Upatnieks, oboe Egīls Šēfers, clarinet David M.A.P. Palmquist, horn Niels Anders Vedsten Larsen, bassoon Recorded in Mogens Dahl Concert Hall in Copenhagen Video by Jānis Vingris, Eho Filma.

 

Tagged with: , , ,

Paul Hindemith – Bassoon Sonata – Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Chamber Soloists

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 24, 2018

Saint-Saens Bassoon Sonata:

 

 

Published on Dec 19, 2016

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Chamber Soloists play Paul Hindemith. Bassoon Sonata (1938) – Helma van den Brinck, Bassoon; Sepp Grotenhuis, Piano;

AP MUSIC THEORY – Guide for Part Writing, Counterpoint, Composition, Figured Bass, Non Chord Tones

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 22, 2018

 

Published on Mar 31, 2013

This video talks about guidelines for successful partwriting and counterpoint Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA LIKE US!! and SHARE and SUBSCRIBE!! https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd…. Thanks for Watching

Italian Summer – Piano, Violin

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 21, 2018

 

Provided to YouTube by TuneCore Italian Summer (Piano and Violin) · Classical New Age Piano Music Classical New Age Piano and Violin Duets ℗ 2014 BrianCrain.com Records Released on: 2011-11-14

 

Tagged with: , ,

GARY EWER – The Essential Secrets of Songwriting Blog

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 19, 2018

Nickelback

Five Songwriting Ponderables

Do you ever find that when you’re talking to other musicians about music in general, there’s a list of “the things you’re most likely to say” guiding your conversations?

Everyone has their big issues in music. Their pet peeves. Their guiding principles. Their “why do people think this way!?” kind of rants.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE READING

Thanks to   https://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/2018/06/14/five-songwriting-ponderables/

Tagged with:
%d bloggers like this: