By Winifred Phillips

This photo shows video game composer Winifred Phillips working in her music production studio. Phillips has composed music for titles in five of the most popular franchises in gaming (Assassin's Creed, God of War, Total War, The Sims, LittleBigPlanet).

Hello there!  I’m videogame composer Winifred Phillips, and it’s time once again for our yearly collection of top resources for game audio practitioners!  The following article contains an expanded and updated collection of links on an assortment of subjects important to the game audio community.  We kick things off with a list of concert tours and annual game music events.  After that, we check out the online game audio communities that we can join for support and assistance.  We’ll take a look at the software applications currently in use by game audio pros.  Finally, we’ll look at what’s going on in the world of game audio conferences and academia.

Everybody ready to go?  Let’s do this!

PLEASECONTINUE READING

scottbrothersduo

33.7K subscribers

Jonathan Scott performs his solo organ arrangement of Allegro con brio from Symphony No. 5 in c minor Op. 67 by Ludwig van Beethoven at the organ of St. Nicolas’ Church, Toulouse, France. The score of this arrangement is available here: http://www.scottbrothersduo.com/SCORE… Organ by Daublaine & Callinet (1845) – Full details below. Filmed at the 2019 Toulouse Organ Festival – Toulouse les Orgues. Film & Sound by Tom Scott Please visit: http://www.scottbrothersduo.com

THE ORGAN OF ST. NICOLAS CHURCH, TOULOUSE, FRANCE Daublaine & Callinet (1845) Poirier & Lieberknecht (1857) Maurice Puget (1944) Restauration Orgues Giroud Successeurs, Jacques Nonnet (gérant) (2002-04)

The organ (without case) was exhibited at the French Industrial Exposition of 1844 in Paris and was classified as a historical monument on May 4, 1987. The organ was given a case and installed at St. Nicolas in 1844-5. It was inaugurated by Alfred Lefebure-Wély on February 28, 1845

Presented by Oscar Osicki – Music Analysis

Performed by Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Stephane Deneve, conductor


Inside the Score


115K subscribers

Episode 7 of Discovering Classical Music

My Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/insidethescore

A listener’s guide to Berlioz’s Magnum Opus – Symphonie Fantastique, famously inspired by a drug-induced, opium trip where the artist fantasizes about his beloved, then his own public execution, then his dark, Satanic funeral. Lots of musical examples, and recommended recordings at the end.

Presented by Oscar Osicki

BIOGRAPHY

MrOzemanue

5.89K subscribers

From 1963 album “Seven Steps to Heaven”

Gary EwerThe Essential Secrets of Songwriting

In music, the tonic chord is the chord that represents the key of the song:

C  Dm  Am  G  C

In that progression, the key is C major, and C is the tonic chord.

The psychology of music makes the tonic chord sound like “home” to us. Our brains relax when, after a long sequence of chords, we hear the tonic chord happen. Play that progression and you’ll hear what I mean. We hear a kind of musical “tension” building up as the progression moves from Am to G, and that tension is released when we hear C return.

Writing a Song From a Chord Progression

f you like starting songs by working out chord progressions, you need this eBook: “Writing a Song From a Chord Progression.” It shows you how to avoid the typical problems that can arise from this common songwriting process. Get it separately, or as part of “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting 10-eBook Bundle.”

Writing a Song From a Chord Progression ($9.95 USD) or Read More

Guitar and Piano

Starting Chord Progressions Away From the Tonic Chord

Posted on January 2, 2020 by Gary Ewer

In music, the tonic chord is the chord that represents the key of the song:

C  Dm  Am  G  C

In that progression, the key is C major, and C is the tonic chord.

The psychology of music makes the tonic chord sound like “home” to us. Our brains relax when, after a long sequence of chords, we hear the tonic chord happen. Play that progression and you’ll hear what I mean. We hear a kind of musical “tension” building up as the progression moves from Am to G, and that tension is released when we hear C return.


Writing a Song From a Chord Progression

If you like starting songs by working out chord progressions, you need this eBook: “Writing a Song From a Chord Progression.” It shows you how to avoid the typical problems that can arise from this common songwriting process. Get it separately, or as part of “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting 10-eBook Bundle.”Writing a Song From a Chord Progression ($9.95 USD) or Read More


It’s common for progressions to start on the tonic chord, like that sample one above. But sometimes, particularly in verse progressions, it can be musically advantageous to start a progression on a chord other than the tonic.

The problem with starting on a non-tonic chord is that you can feel a bit like the progression is trying to find a direction, and not being very successful at it. That usually happens when you improvise on chord progressions.

So here’s a much better way to create progressions that don’t start on the tonic chord: Write one that does start on the tonic, and when you’ve got one that you like, simply remove the starting tonic.

It’s often the case that you can’t easily remove a chord from a progression and have it work well. In the spot where the chord has been removed, it often (though not always) sounds like something’s missing.

But removing the first chord from a progression, particularly if it’s the tonic, usually works just fine. For example:

C  Am  Bb  F  C

That’s a progression in C major that uses one non-diatonic chord (i.e., one chord — Bb — that doesn’t naturally exist in C major). As it is, it’s a fine progression; there’s no reason at all that you can’t use it in that form, starting on the tonic chord.

But there’s a nice momentary “where are we?” sound that comes from not starting on the C, but choosing to start on the Am instead. Listen to the following sound file, and you’ll hear what I mean:

That’s a progression in C major that uses one non-diatonic chord (i.e., one chord — Bb — that doesn’t naturally exist in C major). As it is, it’s a fine progression; there’s no reason at all that you can’t use it in that form, starting on the tonic chord.

But there’s a nice momentary “where are we?” sound that comes from not starting on the C, but choosing to start on the Am instead. Listen to the following sound file, and you’ll hear what I mean:

Posted on January 2, 2020 by Gary Ewer

In music, the tonic chord is the chord that represents the key of the song:

C  Dm  Am  G  C

In that progression, the key is C major, and C is the tonic chord.

The psychology of music makes the tonic chord sound like “home” to us. Our brains relax when, after a long sequence of chords, we hear the tonic chord happen. Play that progression and you’ll hear what I mean. We hear a kind of musical “tension” building up as the progression moves from Am to G, and that tension is released when we hear C return.


Writing a Song From a Chord Progression

If you like starting songs by working out chord progressions, you need this eBook: “Writing a Song From a Chord Progression.” It shows you how to avoid the typical problems that can arise from this common songwriting process. Get it separately, or as part of “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting 10-eBook Bundle.”Writing a Song From a Chord Progression ($9.95 USD) or Read More


It’s common for progressions to start on the tonic chord, like that sample one above. But sometimes, particularly in verse progressions, it can be musically advantageous to start a progression on a chord other than the tonic.

The problem with starting on a non-tonic chord is that you can feel a bit like the progression is trying to find a direction, and not being very successful at it. That usually happens when you improvise on chord progressions.

So here’s a much better way to create progressions that don’t start on the tonic chord: Write one that does start on the tonic, and when you’ve got one that you like, simply remove the starting tonic.

It’s often the case that you can’t easily remove a chord from a progression and have it work well. In the spot where the chord has been removed, it often (though not always) sounds like something’s missing.

But removing the first chord from a progression, particularly if it’s the tonic, usually works just fine. For example:

C  Am  Bb  F  C

That’s a progression in C major that uses one non-diatonic chord (i.e., one chord — Bb — that doesn’t naturally exist in C major). As it is, it’s a fine progression; there’s no reason at all that you can’t use it in that form, starting on the tonic chord.

But there’s a nice momentary “where are we?” sound that comes from not starting on the C, but choosing to start on the Am instead. Listen to the following sound file, and you’ll hear what I mean:

As you hear, I’ve opted to keep the final C, after which the progression keeps repeating with the tonic chord. But there’s something nice about starting on that Am. It gives the progression a touch of edginess that can be useful in a verse, depending on the song’s subject matter.

There is also a strengthened sense of forward motion that comes from a non-tonic start, as you can hear in Lennon & McCartney’s “All My Loving“, or for a more recent example, “Call Me Maybe” (Carly Rae Jepsen, Josh Ramsay, Tavish Crowe) which starts on a IV-chord.

Gary Ewer

Written by Gary Ewer. Follow Gary on Twitter.

Essential Secrets of Songwriting Bundle

Each eBook in “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” 10-eBook Bundles shows you the fundamental principles that make great songs great. Comes with a Study Guide and a FREE copy of “Use Your Words! Developing a Lyrics-First Songwriting Process”

Buy the Bundle ($37) or Read MoreVIEW the TABLE OF CONTENTS

Kent Hewitt

107K subscribers

Piano jazz tutorial on of the concepts of Tetrachords, Tritones, and the Circle of Fifths relating to the symmetry of musical tones. The cosmic nature of perfection of music derived from ancient Greek concepts.


ComeUntoChrist.org

301K subscribers

300+ members of a world-famous choir combine with over 2,000 voices worldwide in an incredible musical tribute to Jesus Christ.

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir sings the Hallelujah Chorus with over 2,000 people around the world virtually singing from videos uploaded to YouTube. Watch how all these voices are incorporated with the Tabernacle Choir.

Chromatic Thirds

December 27, 2019

Berklee Online

180K subscribers

Download our free course catalog: http://berkonl.in/2aLSxkF Enroll in Music Theory and Composition 4: http://berkonl.in/2omAWVI

Composers began using chromatic thirds related harmony around the 1830s and beyond, in order to create new colors and sounds that didn’t function within the regular tonal system. Chromatic thirds can provide dark and sinister flavors to your compositions, and can be readily found in film, television, and video game scores.

Watch more videos in this series: Whole Tone Scale: https://youtu.be/MotdhW3mMVM Spanish Phrygian Scale: https://youtu.be/yRggh1XXZZI Octatonic Scale: https://youtu.be/BBMqddr_uvU Lydian Augmented Scale: https://youtu.be/-X2HNQPdWWg


Bill Hilton
209K subscribers

Want to know more about chord theory and how harmony works? This tutorial takes a look at some of the more exotic chords you might find in a progression. It reviews the basics of diatonic chords and how to generate them and the different functions of important chords. Then I talk about secondary dominants, an interesting chord substitution and the notoriously tricksy diminished seventh chord.

Check out my book: http://www.billspianopages.com/how-to…

Support me on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/billhilton

The jazz/blues piano tutorial I reference in this tutorial: http://youtu.be/67LabSzL32g

If you’d like to know more about harmony, music theory or piano, be sure to check out and subscribe to my piano channel, where you’ll find hundreds of massively popular tutorials explaining key concepts in a clear, straightforward style!

How to Listen to Classical Music: Sonata Form


Inside the Score

109K subscribers

Full Explanation of the Most Important Structure in Classical Music – Sonata Form.

Create GREAT Performances From Melody And Chords

This is the first in a series of three tutorials in which I’m going to show you how to take a melody and chords in the form of a lead sheet and work them up into a series of progressively more advanced piano performances. In this first tutorial we’ll take a look at the lead sheet we’ll be working from and explore how to use it to create a simple piano performance using right hand melody and block chords in the left.

This is the second in a series of three piano tutorials in which I show you how to take a lead sheet (melody and chords) and turn it into a series of progressively more complex performances on the piano. In this second tutorial I cover how to create a richer and more interesting right hand part (rather than just playing the melody line) by using chord notes, multiple voices and chord extension.

This is the third in a series of three piano tutorials in which I show you how to take a lead sheet (melody and chords) and turn it into a series of progressively more complex performances on the piano. In this second tutorial I cover how to create a richer and more interesting right hand part (rather than just playing the melody line) by using chord notes, multiple voices and chord extension.


Bill Hilton

208K subscribers

Arranging Christmas Carols

December 7, 2019


fyrexianoff

6.34K subscribers


zingerz

8.04K subscribers

From my debut album, “Fulfillment,” out now! Explanation below: Instagram: @zaczinger Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/zaczingermusic/ Website: https://www.zaczinger.com/

Bandcamp: https://zaczinger.bandcamp.com/ iTunes/Apple Music: https://apple.co/2Mw3HMh Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2M8J4Xx Google Play: https://bit.ly/2IJxVtZ

In 2017, I had a truly meaningful ten-day trip to Taiwan as part of my fellowship with the Asian Cultural Council (ACC). I knew nothing of the country or the culture before visiting, but I left inspired by the extraordinary kindness of each and every person I met. Strangers walking me to my destination when I got lost, opening their homes for me to stay, showing me the wonders of the Taipei night market… I never felt anything but welcome in every place I went. Couple that with a stunning countryside, mystical temples, and exquisite cuisine, and you have a tiny island oasis that’s unlike any place in the world.

This piece is dedicated to the people I met in Taiwan. It’s recorded on a dizi I bought there, and though I’m no expert on it, I think that’s perfectly appropriate to represent the experience of a foreigner trying to understand and fit into a new culture. I’m thrilled that three of the musicians I met during my visit who inspired the tune were able to record on it, literally embodying the inspiration for the piece. Special thanks to Min-chin Kuo (郭岷勤), Yu-wei Hsieh (謝宇威), and Chia-kun Chen (陳家崑) for playing on this, and to Chi-wei Ho (何其偉) and Yao-Hsing Li (李曜行) for recording the audio and video in Taipei.

Additional special thanks to all those I met in Taiwan who showed me the best in humanity: Charlotte Fleming, Rita Chang and the ACC Taipei, Vincent Lin (林長志), Melody Lee (軒念), Guo Wenming (郭文明), Pan I-tung (潘宜彤), Jen Chung (任重), Ching-Tung Liao (廖錦棟), Tsai Chia-fen (蔡佳芬), Kao Chen-Ning (高辰寧), Chao-Hsien Tu (杜昭賢), Wan-Jung Wu (吳婉榕), Yang Yu-wen (楊有文) from Ten Drum Village, Ying-Chen Lin (林映辰), Charles Tang (唐瑋廷), Charlie Silva, Sean Sinclair, Jessica Luk, and all of the affable strangers who went out of their way to accommodate a lost-looking American. This song is for you.

Written, arranged, mixed and produced by Zac Zinger.

Dizi – Zac Zinger Piano – Sharik Hasan Bass – Adam Neely Drums – Luke Markham

Special guests (recorded in Taipei, Taiwan): Guzheng – Min-chin Kuo (郭岷勤) Vocals – Yu-Wei Hsieh (謝宇威) Erhu – Chia-kun Chen (陳家崑)

Video Editing and Production – Alessio Romano New York Recording Engineer/Videographer – Alessio Romano Recorded at Studio 42 in Brooklyn, NY. https://m.youtube.com/c/Studio42Brooklyn


Anderson & Roe Piano Duo

35.2K subscribers

http://www.andersonroe.com | Anderson & Roe play their own arrangement of Astor Piazzolla’s “Libertango.”

Camera work: Ming Wang, Greg Anderson, Elizabeth Roe * Teacher’s voice: Estelle Choi

A performance of this piece is featured on the Anderson & Roe Piano Duo debut album, “Reimagine!” Greg Anderson & Elizabeth Joy Roe showcase their unique approach to classical music and the piano duo genre in this adrenalized album, featuring breathtaking music, a hard-core performance of Stravinsky’s ‘Rite of Spring,’ and a bonus DVD of music videos.

Buy it today on CD Baby (http://cdbaby.com/cd/andersonroe ), Amazon, iTunes, and DigStation.

Learn more about the Anderson & Roe Piano Duo at: http://www.andersonroe.com https://www.facebook.com/andersonroe https://twitter.com/andersonroe

40 FINGERS – Libertango

November 20, 2019

40 Fingers117K subscribers

Original music by Astor Piazzolla, arranged and played by 40 Fingers. Matteo Brenci – Emanuele Grafitti – Marco Steffè – Andrea Vittori Listen to our album on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WYFv90

Find us on Facebook and Instagram! http://www.facebook.com/40fingersguit… http://www.instagram.com/40fingersgui…

Video Production by Giulio Ladini

Audio Production by Matteo Brenci

Thanks to Azienza Agricola Lupinc

Songwriter with guitar

SECRETS OF SONGWRITING

In the music industry, there’s not a lot of interest in a one-off. If sometime in the past you wrote a great song, but you haven’t been able to follow it up with something similarly excellent, industry folks will be skeptical when you metaphorically come knocking.

How to Harmonize a Melody

Have a  great melody, but stuck at the “how to add chords to it” stage? “How To Harmonize a Melody” shows you, step-by-step and with sound samples, how it’s done, with suggestions for chord substitutions that might work as well. It’s part of “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” 10-eBook Bundle.

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So how do you become more consistent? How do you make sure that that one great song can be followed up by something similarly great. And then another?

Consistent excellence is hard in the creative arts because everything you do needs to be unique. So following up one great song with another great one means that you must write something entirely different but still appealing to your target audience, and do that right away. Not easy!

If you’re trying to develop your songwriting skills to the point where most of the music you write is excellent in some way, here are some tips to consider:

  1. Write fragments. Don’t be afraid to spend your day writing short fragments of songs. Bits of lyric that sound enticing, a short hook, a phrase, a part of a verse… putting them together can come later. Get your imagination working for you!
  2. Make songwriting a daily activity. Every day, if possible, pick up your guitar and see what happens. Staying “in the zone” means making songwriting a habit, and that’s always a good thing.
  3. Don’t forget to take breaks. Yes, it’s a daily activity, but any time you feel frustration setting in means you’ve likely spent too much time on one songwriting activity. That’s the beginning of a bout with writer’s block.
  4. Take entire days off. There are times when it’s good to not feel that you must get something written. Maybe it’s a day with family, hanging out with friends, or otherwise just getting away. Giving your musical brain some time off is occasionally necessary.
  5. Record demos frequently. By “demo” I simply mean pick up your guitar, or sit at a keyboard, and do a rough recording for yourself. This allows you to hear your songs, or song fragments, from a listener’s point of view, and that can help you develop ideas for what to do next.
  6. Find other songwriters you can collaborate with. Sometimes sitting down with someone else is a great way to explore different parts of your musical brain. Make sure that whoever you partner up with is someone you can easily work with. Don’t add frustration to your frustration!
  7. Explore different styles and genres. Every songwriter will favour one or two genres, but by exploring different compositional styles you increase the likelihood that you’ll write something unique, and gives you a better shot at being consistently excellent. Just think of how different “Penny Lane”, “When I’m Sixty-Four”, “Hey Jude!” and “Back in the U.S.S.R.” are from each other!

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Gary EwerWritten by Gary Ewer. Follow Gary on Twitter. Hooks & Riffs“Hooks and Riffs: How They Grab Attention, Make Songs Memorable, and Build Your Fan Base” shows you how a good hook can make the difference between songwriting success and failure. With great examples from pop music history.

Written by Gary Ewer. Follow on Twitter.

“The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” 10-eBook Bundle

Thousands of songwriters have been using “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” 10-eBook Bundle to polish their songwriting skills and raise their level of excellence. Right now, get a free copy of “Use Your Words! Developing a Lyrics-First Songwriting Process” when you buy the Bundle.Buy the Bundle ($37) or Read MoreVIEW the TABLE OF CONTENTSPosted in songwriting.

2 CELLOS – Thunderstruck

November 13, 2019

2CELLOS

4.67M subscribers

http://www.facebook.com/2Cellos

http://www.instagram.com/2cellosofficial

From our new album Celloverse – out now! iTunes: http://smarturl.it/celloverse Amazon:

http://smarturl.it/celloverse-amz

From our new album Celloverse – out now! iTunes: http://smarturl.it/celloverse Amazon: http://smarturl.it/celloverse-amz

Video by Kristijan Burlovic Story by 2CELLOS

Editing: Ivan Stifanic and 2CELLOS Technical support: MedVid produkcija

Jervy Hou

265K subscribers