Playing Parallel Fourths

July 14, 2019

MangoldProject
Published on Jun 14, 2019 MangoldProject

Some Hank Jones, doing his thing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Sbp2…

Last week we’ve discussed using stacks of fourths in the context of harmony, but they can be equally useful when constructing melodies! Here I’m going to point out they can be used to play melody lines as well, with quite a distinctive, modal sound. To do this, I’ll play an excerpt out of a Hank Jones piece and we’ll discuss it briefly.

MangoldProject
Published on Apr 15, 2017

Tritone substitutions refer to changing a dominant chord for another dominant chord a tritone away. A tritone is simply a musical interval equal to six semitones. In this video I’m going to show you why this works and then present a few examples – using both chord progressions and soloing – the demonstrate where you might use this in musical context.

Polyphonic
Published on Aug 10, 2017

GET A POSTER BASED ON THIS VIDEO: https://store.dftba.com/collections/p.

Greg Panfile Essay: http://www.surfermoon.com/essays/mob3…

Music by Pracs: https://soundcloud.com/pracs

Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/polyphonic

cminor7add9th
Published on Mar 26, 2011

Keith Jarrett & Chick Corea Play MOZART with The New Japan Philharmonic

Tokyo Music Joy at Yu-Port Kani Hoken Hall in Shinagawa-Ku Tokyo Feburary 1st ,

1985 The New Japan Philharmonic Conductor : Yoshikazu Tanaka

Yasuhisa Tanaka
Published on Oct 24, 2010

Duet 02 Old Castle, by the River, in the Middle of a Forest

Comment by Joseph Armand

Ok. Piano virtuosity doesn’t come any plainer than this. Two peerless players…’playing’ together. The loosest, tightest example of improvisation around. Points countered. Absolute respect. Old master…young brilliant. Absolutely in synch…dancing, chasing, clashing, arguing, talking, dreaming. These are 13 magical moments of which you won’t find a musical equivalence.

AntPDC
Published on Feb 28, 2013

(c) 2004 Channel Four: The Beatles – 20th Century Greats

UPDATE: here’s John Lennon on George Martin’s influence in a 1975 BBC interview with “whispering” Bob Harris: https://youtu.be/lrRl065BR2w

Music has been a central part of my entire life, yet to this day I’ve never understood how it all works in terms of its emotional “mechanics”.

In Desert Island Discs mode, for me there are three towering influences: The Beatles, Bach, and Handel – they are the big three, without question. And for for those of us who hold the music of The Beatles in the highest esteem, here classical composer Howard Goodall gives us an informed and absorbing account of their musical innovation, their influence, and their lasting legacy.

It’s a real privilege to be educated by someone who can express the language of music so eloquently, as classical composer and wider musician. Not everyone is going to agree with him here, but he’s persuasive.

I’m looking forward to comments about Howard Goodall’s personal survey here, and to kick them off, the thing that struck me most was the idea of “instinctive” compositional talent, and the influence of classically-trained Sir George Martin. I have no idea why Goodall completely ignored George Martin’s contribution to the Beatles’ musical output. It’s a pretty staggering omission. Maybe it would have polluted the populist idea of Everyman, as composer?

Currently this has not been released on DVD or any other purchasable format. I am therefore uploading to my Channel to share musical education with others.

It is available elsewhere on YouTube, but I wanted to draw my Subs’ attention to it.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Music Video Vault
Published on Aug 29, 2018

A brilliant interpretation of the Academy Award song “Over the Rainbow”.

Performed in Tokyo 1984

If you’re still struggling with the fact that all your songs sound similar, the first step in dealing with it might be not to worry: a bit of similarity is not necessarily something that needs to be avoided.

After all, if you listen to any hit group, you’re going to notice at least some similarities, and as listeners we kind of like that. The problem is excessive similarity, when every song seems to be almost a copy of the previous one.

If you struggle at the lyric-writing stage of songwriting, you need to read “Use Your Words! Developing a Lyrics-First Songwriting Process.” Right now, it’s FREE with your purchase of “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting 10-eBook Bundle”

It’s not just the melodies that start to sound the same. You notice that many aspects of your songs are too alike:

PLEASE CONTINUE READING

Gary Ewer

Written by Gary Ewer. Follow Gary on Twitter.

“The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” 10-eBook Bundle

The perfect combination: “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting 10-eBook Bundle” and a Study Guide! Dig into the songwriting manuals that thousands of songwriters are using to polish their technique, complete with a study guide to show you how to progress through the materials. Comes with an 11th FREE ebook: “Use Your Words! Developing a Lyrics-First Songwriting Process”

Brilliant Classics
Published on Jun 18, 2019

This album contains a musical portrait of Johannes Brahms in piano works from his early and later years, presented by Piano Classics, a label of Brilliant Classics

Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): https://PianoClassics.lnk.to/PianoSon…

Available for licensing: https://www.brilliantclassicslicensin…

More Information: https://www.piano-classics.com/articl…

Social media: Facebook: https://PianoClassics.lnk.to/Facebook Instagram: https://brilliant-classics.lnk.to/Ins…

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Every bar of the Sonata burns with longing and passion thwarted, even the Andante tellingly prefaced with lines from the Romantic poet Sternau: ‘The twilight falls, the moonlight gleams, two hearts in love unite, embraced in rapture’. Almost four decades later, Brahms signed off as a composer with the more subtle and even playful spirit of a sublimely allusive quartet of opus numbers, the three Intermezzi Op.117, the seven Fantasias Op.116 and the two sets of mixed genre-pieces that make up Opp. 118 and 119.

These demand the most refined command of phrasing and harmony – at points they come closer than any other work of Brahms to casting loose from the anchor of tonality and anticipating the world of Schoenberg, for whom Brahms was an exemplar – and are eminently suited to a pianist such as Kopachevsky who has already proved himself at home in the twilit world of Liszt and Scriabin, in music on the brink of extinction. A richly rewarding release for all lovers of Romantic piano music and another feather in the cap of a superb young pianist.

Philipp Kopachevsky made his Piano Classics debut in 2016 with an ambitious selection of late Scriabin and Liszt, and Bryce Morrison in Gramophone was impressed: ‘haunting in confidentiality… no less powerful in storm and stress… never less than sensitive.’

Composer: Johannes Brahms

Artist: Philipp Kopachevsky (piano)

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Tracklist: Piano Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 5: 00:00:00 I. Allegro maestoso 00:09:52 II. Andante espressivo 00:20:46 III. Scherzo, allegro energico 00:25:35 IV. Intermezzo, andante molto 00:29:17 V. Finale, allegro moderato ma rubato 3 Intermezzi, Op. 117: 00:36:30 I. Andante moderato in E-Flat Major 00:42:11 II. Andante non troppo in B-Flat Minor 00:47:24 III. Andante con moto in C-Sharp Minor 17 Fantasien, Op. 116: 00:54:07 I. Capriccio in D Minor. Presto energico 00:56:29 II. Intermezzo in A Minor. Andante 01:00:27 III. Capriccio in G Minor. Allegro passionate 01:03:32 IV. Intermezzo in E Major. Adagio 01:08:12 V. Intermezzo in E Minor. Andante con grazia ed intimissimo sentiment 01:10:58 VI. Intermezzo in E Major. Andantino teneramente 01:14:05 VII. Capriccio in D Minor. Allegro agitato 6 Klavierstücke, Op. 118: 01:16:17 I. Intermezzo in A Minor. Allegro non assai 01:18:15 II. Intermezzo in A Major. Andante teneramente 01:24:22 III. Ballade in G Minor. Allegro energico 01:27:54 IV. Intermezzo in F Minor. Allegretto un poco agitato 01:30:29 V. Romanze in F Major. Andante 01:34:41 VI. Intermezzo in E-Flat Minor. Andante, largo e mesto 4 Klavierstücke, Op. 119: 01:40:47 I. Intermezzo in B Minor. Adagio 01:44:33 II. Intermezzo in E Minor. Andantino un poco agitato 01:49:25 III. Intermezzo in C Major. Grazioso e giocoso 01:51:09 IV. Rhapsodie in E-Flat Major. Allegro risoluto

Bill Hilton
Published on May 27, 2019

http://www.billspianopages.com/how-to… ↓↓↓MORE LINKS AND DOWNLOADS BELOW↓↓↓

Vocalization is an incredibly useful technique to improve your piano improvisation – one used by major stars of jazz and blues piano in particular, though it’s used across the piano playing spectrum from pop to classical.

The basic idea is that vocalization allows you to tune into your intuitive musicality to save yourself being too consciously technical when you’re improvising at the piano keyboard. The piano is basically a machine, and it’s very easy to get tied up in the logic process of deciding which key to press when, which chord to use in particular places and so on – and that’s even before you get on to thinking about what to do with the pedals and how to deal with the idiosyncrasies of different pianos.

In this piano tutorial I introduce vocalization by working through a pretty straightforward eight-bar improvisation exercise that you should be able to manage as long as you’re familiar with some basic chords – or you’re willing to copy the chords I’m playing on the keyboard – and you know the names of the notes on the piano.

Vocalising as you improvising won’t magically make you into a piano improvisation genius overnight, but it will help you produce much more natural-sounding improvised lines, especially when improvising melodically in the right hand. Beware, though – if you incorporate this into your piano practice anyone listen to you might think you’re a bit weird! Vocalization is definitely worth the effort, though, so give it a go.

MY BOOKS How To Really Play The Piano (book): http://www.billspianopages.com/how-to… Seven Studies in Pop piano (book): http://www.billspianopages.com/seven-… PDF of chords: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BBw…

SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS Facebook: http://fb.me/billhiltonpiano Twitter: http://twitter.com/billhilton Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/billhilton

Mixing Musical Textures

June 13, 2019

Musical Texture (Definition of Monophonic, Homophonic, Polyphonic, Heterophonic Textures)

Mixing Musical Textures | Jazz Trio | TEDxYouth@Wayland

Jazz improvisation for radical collaboration | Jim Kalbach | TEDxJerseyCity

In the Studio Textures – Awake

Vocal Production Tutorial: How to Add Texture with Reverb and More

Meet the Artist – Richard Blackford, composer – The Cross-Eyed Pianist

Who or what inspired you to pursue a career in music?

Who or what were the most significant influences on your musical life and career as a composer?

What have been the greatest challenges/frustrations of your career so far?

Of which works are you most proud?

What are the special challenges/pleasures of working on a commissioned piece?

What are the special challenges/pleasures of working with particular musicians, singers, ensembles and orchestras?

How would you characterise your compositional/musical language?

Meet the Artist – Richard Blackford, composer – The Cross-Eyed Pianist

Brilliant Classics
Published on May 31, 2019

Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Tidal, Google Play): https://brilliant-classics.lnk.to/JSB…

Physical Purchase: https://www.brilliantclassics.com/art…

Mindaugas Piecaitis
Published on Jul 7, 2009

FREE! “Main Themes from CATcerto” piano version: http://www.catcerto.com/mainthemes.pdf

http://www.catcerto.com

http://www.piecaitis.com

http://norathepianocat.com/

Clarinet Improvisation

May 28, 2019

q
Published on Mar 2, 2013

Album: The Sesjun Radio Shows 2011 by Bill Evans

Bill Evans: Piano Bass:

Eddie Gomez

Drums: Eliot Zigmund