I Write The Music

Amadeus Mozart – Piano Sonatas – w scores

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 12, 2018

 

 

 

 

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How To Build and Use Polychords Part 1 – by Rick Beato

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 9, 2018

 

 

Published on Jul 14, 2016

This is Everything Music Episode 8 called How To Build and Use Polychords Part 1. If you want to get even more in depth on Polychords or any of my other content, Please check out my Patreon link below. It will tell you how to get PDF’s of all my video content. Thanks! Follow Me On: YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/c/RickBeato Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/rickbeatopro… Patreon – http://patreon.com/user?u=3400819 Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/rickbeato1/

 

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The MYSTERY Chord – MinMaj7 (Minor Major 7th) [MUSIC THEORY / SONGWRITING LESSON]

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 9, 2018

 

Published on Sep 21, 2018

Thank you to my Patreon supporters! They literally are why these lessons exist. https://bit.ly/2zFwzOO My new 80’s single – https://youtu.be/bHwwJihitl0 The minMaj7 chord is a hilariously unique and distinct chord that is almost universally perceived as mysterious, creepy, or uncertain. I ask all my students how chords “feel” to them and none of them have EVER named this chord with a positive or bright emotion. It’s good for a gag, but is also very lovely when combined in melodic ways. This video demonstrates the basics of the minor major 7th chord, the music theory on how to build it, where you may have heard it before, and some advice on how you might use it yourself. A special thank you to: Linas Orentas Marek Pawlowski John Arnold Christopher Swanson Marc Bulandr

 

 

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“Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind.” — Art of Quotation

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 8, 2018

“Without craftsmanship,

inspiration is a mere reed

shaken in the wind.”

Johannes Brahms, composer

via “Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind.” — Art of Quotation

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BERKLEE SHARES – Creating Hooks – Songwriting Tips from Neil Diercks | Berklee Online | ASCAP | Songwriting

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 4, 2018

 

 

Published on Aug 30, 2016

Download Your Free Songwriting Handbook Now: https://berkonl.in/2v4qUyj Earn Your Songwriting Degree Online with Berklee: https://berkonl.in/2w6KwPi In this free songwriting tutorial filmed at the 2016 ASCAP Expo, Berklee Online songwriting instructor Neil Diercks offers tips for creating different types and layers of hooks that will make your songs memorable and impactful in the industry. About Berklee Online: Berklee Online is the continuing education division of Berklee College of Music, delivering online access to Berklee’s acclaimed curriculum from anywhere in the world, offering online courses, certificate programs, and degree programs. Call, text, or email an Academic Advisor today: 1-866-BERKLEE (US) 1-617-747-2146 (international callers) advisors@online.berklee.edu http://www.facebook.com/BerkleeOnline http://www.twitter.com/BerkleeOnline http://www.instagram.com/berkleeonline/ About Neil Diercks: Neil Diercks is a Los Angeles-based songwriter, song coach, and musician. He served for many years in various capacities at Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., in Nashville, beginning as an intern and eventually becoming Manager of A&R Activities. It was within this role that he worked with hit songwriters including Gary Burr, Steve Bogard, Stephony Smith, Jeff Stevens, and Victoria Shaw, who penned hits for artists such as Tim McGraw, Garth Brooks, George Strait, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, Ricky Martin, and Christina Aguilera. Neil is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Berklee College of Music, where he studied songwriting, voice, and music business, and went on to serve on the Board of Trustees for three years. He has lectured and led songwriting workshops internationally, and has won several awards for his teaching, including the UPCEA Excellence in Teaching award (2015); the Pearson Excellence In Online Teaching award (2015); The Berklee College of Music Distinguished Faculty Award for Berklee Online (2016). He currently collaborates with songwriters and artists in Los Angeles and around the globe.

 

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Strap locks and flatwounds

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 3, 2018

Bela Bartok – Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110, BB 115 (1937) [Score-Video]

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 3, 2018

 

 

Published on May 31, 2018
Bela Bartok – Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110, BB 115 (1937) Sir Georg Solti & Murray Perahia, pianos Dame Evelyn Glennie and David Corkhill, percussionSupport this YouTube Channel: https://www.patreon.com/georgengianop…

 

Melodic Minor Shred | Creating Melodic Super Structures

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 2, 2018

 

Published on Sep 26, 2018

In this episode we explore how to create long lines using the melodic minor scale and its modes. Linear studies and concepts for soloing. THE BEATO CLUB → https://flatfiv.com/pages/become-a-be… BUY THE BEATO BOOK HERE → http://bit.ly/2uTQFlo Follow my Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/rickbeato1/ **Advanced Harmonic Concepts for Composition and Improvisation Video Course** → http://www.flatfiv.com

 

 

Guitar Rig For The Working Musician – by Jon Beato

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 2, 2018

 

 

Streamed live on Oct 27, 2018

I this episode I talk with my brother Jon about guitar rigs for working cover bands. Pedals, Amps and Guitars discussed.
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How to Write a String Quartet (1) – Movement 1 – Part 1

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on November 1, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published on Aug 4, 2016
How to Write a String Quartet (1) – Movement 1 – Part 1 Please support me writing these videos: https://www.patreon.com/HowtoCompose In these tutorials I demonstrate how to write a string quartet taking the viewer through structure, melody writing, harmony, texture, modulation and accompaniment.

 

Sergei Prokofiev – Piano Concerto No. 5

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 31, 2018

 

 

Published on Nov 4, 2015

– Composer: Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (23 April 1891 — 5 March 1953) – Orchestra: Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra – Conductor: Witold Rowicki – Soloist: Sviatoslav Richter – Year of recording: 1958 Piano Concerto No. 5 in G major, Op. 55, written in 1931-1932. 00:00 – I. Allegro con brio 05:06 – II. Moderato ben accentuato 09:06 – III. Toccata. Allegro con fuoco (più presto che la prima volta) 10:59 – IV. Larghetto 17:40 – V. Vivo After the Fourth Piano Concerto, for the left hand, the Fifth is the least popular of the five piano concertos
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Prokofiev wrote. Yet the work offers much of great appeal and delivers a challenge to the finest virtuosos. The composer spoke of the Fifth’s abundance of melody, pointing out that each of its five movements contains four or more melodies. Those unfamiliar with the concerto might conclude from that statement that the work must be a large one; yet its duration is typically only 22 to 25 minutes. The formal structure of the concerto is unusual and rather episodic, hardly clinging to a typical sonata-allegro scheme. If a tag can be put on the work, one to capture both its music and performance features, it would be “athletic,” or perhaps “acrobatic.” –
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The first movement, marked Allegro con brio, offers a colorful, jumpy main theme, containing wide leaps for the piano and much difficult writing. A lyrical clarinet melody contrasts well with the main material and the movement eventually comes to a brilliant conclusion with a final backward leap on the piano. – The second movement carries the marking Moderato ben accentuato, and while a bit less effervescent and driven, it is also lively in its march theme and contains glissandos and glissando-like elements that leap about and emphasize the grotesque and humorous nature of the main theme. Those coming to the concerto for the first time may find this colorful, rhythmic movement the most appealing of the five. –
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The third movement Toccata derives its main theme from the opening of the first, and serves almost as a belated development section to it. Its furious pace (Allegro con fuoco) and challenging writing for the orchestra, especially for the string section, give the piece a mood of brilliance and breathlessness typical of the composer’s earlier Toccata and of other similar piano works. – The Larghetto fourth movement is the deepest of the five and also the most lyrical. Its main theme is gentle and lovely. A tense middle section is brilliantly conceived, with crashing chords on the piano at the climax accompanying the eerie orchestral rendering of the profound theme. – The finale, marked Vivo, contains a mixture of menace and humor, of otherworldliness and joy.
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Near the end of the exposition a variation on a theme from the third movement appears, and at the same racing tempo. After a dreamy, unearthly middle section, the mood brightens and the piece ends brilliantly. Prokofiev was the soloist in the work’s premiere on 31 October 1932 in Berlin, led by Wilhelm Furtwängler and on the same program with Paul Hindemith as violist in Berlioz’s Harold in Italy. While Prokofiev was only midway though his career, he wrote unfortunately no more works for piano and orchestra after the tepidly-received Fifth Concerto.

 

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How Tongue Placement Relates to Range: Weston Sprott — Essential Trumpet Lessons

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 27, 2018

Check out these syllables trombonist Weston Sprott uses to achieve his intended range. (Note from JH: I’d be cautious about using “syllables” because that can lead to “speaking” with your embouchure. Instead, think of them as mouth shapes, or tongue shapes instead, that way you can focus on the air flow and not the sound […]

via How Tongue Placement Relates to Range: Weston Sprott — Essential Trumpet Lessons

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Paco de Lucía & Al Di Meola – Mediterranean Sundance

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 25, 2018

 

 

Published on Nov 16, 2011

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Songwriting Tips – What’s in my Studio?

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 25, 2018

 

Published on Jul 30, 2017

 

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Ana Vidovic plays Recuerdos de la Alhambra by Francisco Tárrega

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 23, 2018

 

Published on Jun 26, 2015

Ana Vidovic plays Recuerdos de la Alhambra by Francisco Tárrega. http://www.siccasguitars.com
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STING – A Touch Of Jazz

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 20, 2018

 

 

STING – A Touch Of Jazz – 16 Rare Tracks By R&UT https://www.facebook.com/RareAndUnrel… 01: What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life 0:00 02: Moonlight 5:04 03: Windmills Of Your Mind 10:25 04: Until 14:40 05: My One And Only Love 17:47 06: Lullaby To An Anxious Child 21:24 07: I’ll Follow My Secret Heart 23:18 08: It’s A Lonesome Old Town 25:48 09: Angel Eyes 28:26 10: Shape Of My Heart (Acoustic) 32:25 11: Come Down In Time 36:43 12: You Were Meant For Me 40:25 13: Someone To Watch Over me (Live) 44:37 14: The Last Ship (Unplugged) 48:57 15: My Funny Valentine (Featuring Herbie Hancock)52:55 16: Ain’t No Sunshine (Live) 57:41

 

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A Short Guide to Playing Lead on Bass

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 19, 2018

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Creating With Polychords

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 17, 2018

 

 

 

 

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BIILL HILTON – Three Easy Jazzy Pieces, Part 2/3 || Easy Jazz Piano Piece With Score

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 16, 2018

 

Published on Oct 12, 2018

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The second of my Three Easy Jazzy Pieces for piano, fully walked-through and with a downloadable PDF score (see below). This piece is designed to develop left hand skills, and features two very distinctive and important left hand patterns: walking bass and stride.
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Die Orgel von Notre Dame de Paris – Olivier Latry, Titularorganist von Notre Dame de Paris

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on October 15, 2018

 

Published on Feb 13, 2017

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