I Write The Music

Music Foundations Tutorial Pt 4 – Theory Basics: How to Compose a Strong Melody w/ Max Wild

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on May 26, 2016
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Scale Practice Tip #1 – Accenting Different Notes

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on February 20, 2016
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Scale Practice Tip – Accenting Different Notes

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on December 29, 2015

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4 Types of Minor Scale

Posted in Scales, Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on December 28, 2015

Beginner Saxophone Lesson – Major Scales Introduction

Posted in Music Theory, Scales by Higher Density Blog on July 8, 2015
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AP Music Theory – SEVEN modes, scales, figured bass, keys, intervals

Posted in Theory by Higher Density Blog on February 26, 2015

whsaptheory

聽*

This video talks about all the unique relationships in Music Theory to the number 7.
Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
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AP Music Theory – Solfege application – Scales, Chromaticism

Posted in Scales, Theory by Higher Density Blog on February 2, 2015

whsaptheory

Altered Scale Shortcut – Jazz Tutorial

Posted in Scales, Theory by Higher Density Blog on January 4, 2015

jazztutorial

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Join my Jazz Piano emailing list at:
http://www.JazzHeroBooks.com/EMAIL

A deleted scene from my last video (exotic dominant 7 scales). In this one I show you the simplest way to play the altered scale with minimal brain work.

AP Music Theory – Solfege, Scales, Chromaticism

Posted in Theory by Higher Density Blog on December 30, 2014

whsaptheory

Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
LIKE US!! and SHARE and SUBSCRIBE!!

Subscribe Share and Like!!!
https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory
https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd….

A closer look at solfege and how it applies to the major scale, the three forms of minor and chromaticism

Melody – Notes, Scales, Nuts and Bolts – YaleCourses

Posted in Education, Lesson, Presentation, Theory by Higher Density Blog on November 8, 2014

YaleCourses

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture explores the basic nature of melody. Touching on historical periods ranging from ancient Greece to the present day, Professor Wright draws examples from musical worlds as disparate as nineteenth-century Europe and twentieth-century India, China, and America. Professor Wright puts forth a historical, technical, and holistic approach to understanding the way pitches and scales work in music. He concludes his lecture by bringing pitch and rhythm together in a discussion of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Nature of Melody
02:37 – Chapter 2. The Development of Notes and the Scale
14:43 – Chapter 3. Major, Minor, and Chromatic Scales in World Music
33:03 – Chapter 4. Pitch and Rhythm in Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony

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Relative Major and Minor Scales for Guitar

Posted in Scales, Theory, Tonal Centers by Higher Density Blog on August 20, 2014

fishbellyrocks

In this lesson I discuss the concept of “relative” keys, in a simpler form and geared towards scales, and how to find the relative major or minor key. I’ve done this using..(read more and get documentation on my site below)
http://www.walkerguitar.com/basic-mus…

5 Pentatonic Scale Shapes You Must Know – GuitarHabits

Posted in Pentatonic Scales, Scales by Higher Density Blog on August 5, 2014

Music Theory – The Harmonic Minor Scale

Posted in Harmonic Minor, Scales by Higher Density Blog on December 23, 2013

creativeguitarstudio395 videos

http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/

LESSON HANDOUTS /TABS:
http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/l…

Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question…

Q: I am a new subscriber and your lessons are helping me a lot… I cannot thank you enough!

My question is, Can you please cover the Harmonic Minor Scale. I keep hearing about how it is so widely used but after playing it, I cannot seem to get it to sound good over anything. I mostly would like to know where and when I am supposed to be using it. My favorite style of music is the contemporary jazz style. I purchased your album off of your web site and I’m sure that I hear you use it in your music. By the way I love your album. Hope you make another one soon.

Thanks,
Zack Paris, France

Blues Lesson – Scales, Progressions – – by John Ferrara

Posted in Blues, Improvisation, Jazz, Keyboards, Lesson by Higher Density Blog on December 20, 2013

johnferrara10003 videos

Part 1 of a discussion on blues. This video consists of scale choices, and basic progressions with some common variations. Part 2 (in another video) demonstrates some playing examples. Visit http://www.John-Ferrara.com for downloads, and more.

Music Theory 101 – Scales and Modes – JamPlayDotCom

Posted in Modes, Scales by Higher Density Blog on November 6, 2013

John Ferrara – Blues lesson – Scales, Progressions

Posted in Blues, Keyboards, Voicings by Higher Density Blog on September 2, 2013

johnferrara10003 videos

Part 1 of a discussion on blues. This video consists of scale choices, and basic progressions with some common variations. Part 2 (in another video) demonstrates some playing examples. Visit http://www.John-Ferrara.com for downloads, and more.

Melody – Notes, Scales, Nuts and Bolts

Posted in Scales by Higher Density Blog on July 23, 2013
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The Egyptian Scale

Posted in Scales by Higher Density Blog on July 23, 2013

guitarblogupdate190 videos

http://www.andrewwasson.com/

Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers questions from off of his Guitar Blog website…

Q). One problem I’m having when studying scales is that I don’t fully understand how to apply them. Especially, exotic scales. So, could you go through how a guitarist should approach this? Maybe, run through a scale for me I’m studying now, it’s the, “Egyptian Scale.” Thanks Andrew!
Gus — Germany

A). The idea of practicing new scales (whether they’re exotic or not) has a lot to do with having a solid entrance approach with new scales. There’s a 3-Step process I like to use to help my own students with learning scales. Eventually this idea can be adapted to learn any new type of scale.

The method begins with that of pattern recognition, so practice the heck out of your scale shapes all over the neck, in all keys… Also, you must recognize that every scale has it’s own unique harmony, (harmony = the chords that come from the scale you’re studying). Ultimately, there comes the creation of short chord progressions that you can jam on over & over again to attain your; licks, lines, runs, musical statements and ideas. Down the road the scale will become well engrained and very easy to create melodies with!

Thanks for writing in.

The Creative Guitar Studio Web-site:
http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/

Andrew’s Official Q & A Guitar Blog Website:
http://www.andrewwasson.com

MUSIC READING – Level 6: Understanding Key Signatures

Posted in Guitar, Key Signatures by Higher Density Blog on June 8, 2013

creativeguitarstudio365 videos

Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question:

“I am more or less a beginner guitarist and I am hoping that you can help me with a good explanation about something called Musical Key Signatures.

So far, all I keep reading about is some concept to do with it called the, “Clock Theory.” It seems to be used all over the internet, but I just don’t get a number of things to do with this whole topic such as:

1). Why do we have to know about Key Signatures?

2). What can learning about this stuff do to help my guitar playing?

3). What does it all have to do with a Clock? It seems like most of the explanations online keep showing a clock. I just don’t see how music keys relate to clocks?

Thank you for considering my question,
Jacob – Halifax, NS. CANADA

For a Handout of this lesson please follow the link below:
http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/l…

Official Website:
http://www.andrewwasson.com

Follow Andrew on Blogspot:
http://creativeguitarstudio.blogspot.

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