I Write The Music

Limbo Jazz – Wynton Marsalis Quintet with Sachal Jazz Ensemble at Jazz in Marciac 2013

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 26, 2017

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Wynton Marsalis

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Serenade No. 10 in B-flat major, K. 361 “Gran Partita”

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 23, 2017

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Published on Oct 27, 2015

– Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27 January 1756 — 5 December 1791)
– Performers:
Oboe – Stephen Taylor (principal) & Melanie Field
Clarinet – William Blount (principal) & Daniel Olsen
Bassett Horn – Gary Koch (principal) & Mitchell Weiss
Horn – Stewart Rose (principal), Scott Temple, William Purvis, and Russell Rizner
Bassoon – Dennis Godburn (principal) & Marc Goldberg
String Bass – John Feeney
– Conductor: Sir Charles Mackerras
– Year of recording: 1994

Serenade No. 10 for winds in B flat major (“Gran Partita”), K. 361 (K. 370a), written in 1781.

00:00 – I. Largo. Molto Allegro
09:18 – II. Menuetto – Trio I – Trio II
19:35 – III. Adagio
25:06 – IV. Menuetto. Allegretto – Trio I – Trio II
30:28 – V. Romance. Adagio – Allegretto – Adagio
37:49 – VI. Tema con Variazioni
47:22 – VII. Finale. Molto Allegro

Mozart’s 10th Serenade for winds is scored for thirteen instruments (twelve winds and string bass). The piece was probably composed in 1781 or 1782 and is often known by the subtitle “Gran Partita”, though the title is a misspelling and not from Mozart’s hand.

– The opening movement begins with a slow introduction in B flat major in which tutti syncopated rhythms are set in opposition to solo passages for clarinet and oboe. This leads into the Allegro moderato, which is a monothematic sonata form. The first theme of the exposition opens, originally presented in B flat major in the clarinets, later returns in F major in the basset horns and oboes in a modified form as the second theme. This theme continues to be explored in the development and returns in the recapitulation, this time in B flat major both times.

– The second movement is a minuet featuring two contrasting trio sections. The minuet section is in B flat major and uses all the instruments extensively. The first trio is in E-flat major and employs only the clarinets and basset horns. This section leads into a repeat of the minuet section. The second trio section is in the relative minor, G minor, and extensively uses the solo oboe, basset horn and bassoon.

– The third movement, described by Goodwin as “virtually an ‘operatic’ ensemble of passionate feeling and sensuous warmth”, marked Adagio, is in E flat major. A syncopated pulse occurs almost throughout the movement while solo lines alternate between the solo oboe, clarinet and basset horn.

– The fourth movement is a second minuet; like the second movement, it has two trio sections. The fast, staccato minuet section is in B flat major. The first trio, by contrast, has fewer staccato notes and is in the parallel minor, B-flat minor. After the minuet section is repeated, the second trio is played. This section is in F major and is largely legato.

– The fifth movement, labeled Romance, returns to the slow tempo and E flat major tonality of the third movement. The movement begins and ends with an Adagio section in the tonic and in triple meter with many long notes in the melody. Contrasting with these sections is an Allegretto section between them, which is in C minor and features constant pulse in the bassoons.

– The sixth movement is a set of six variations on an andante theme in B flat major. The theme is presented primarily by the solo clarinet. The variations make use of various rhythmic motives and often feature solo instruments; for example, the first variation features the solo oboe. Unlike the other variations, all of which are in B flat major, the fourth variation is in B flat minor. The last two variations are in different tempos from the rest of the movement: the fifth is marked Adagio, while the sixth is marked Allegretto. The last variation is also in triple meter, in contrast with the other variations, which are in duple meter. This movement, without variation three, was adapted by Mozart as the second movement of the Flute Quartet in C major (K. 285b).

– The seventh and last movement is a rondo. The movement employs many tutti passages in which the oboes and clarinets play in unison, particularly in the rondo theme. The episodes between the returns of the theme feature a greater degree of interplay between the instruments.

There is a famous reference to this piece in the film “Amadeus” (Milos Forman 1984). Salieri’s first encounter with Mozart is at a performance of this piece, where he listens to it and is overwhelmed. This is his fantastic quote on the 3rd movement (Adagio): “On the page it looked nothing. The beginning simple, almost comic. Just a pulse – bassoons and basset horns – like a rusty squeezebox. Then suddenly – high above it – an oboe, a single note, hanging there unwavering, till a clarinet took over and sweetened it into a phrase of such delight! This was no composition by a performing monkey! This was a music I’d never heard. Filled with such longing, such unfulfillable longing, it had me trembling. It seemed to me that I was hearing the very voice of God.”

 

Music Theory: Roman Numeral Notation in Major & Minor

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 22, 2017

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Determining chord progressions in a song

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 22, 2017

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How the Roman Numeral System Works – Music Theory

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 21, 2017

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Santana – guitar solo / 12 bar blues jam – 11/26/1989 (Official)

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 20, 2017

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Baltic Youth Philharmonic (BYP): Composers’ workshop 2011 with Daniel Schnyder

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 19, 2017

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Women Musicians At Home

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 19, 2017

woman mucian

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?visual=true&url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F318046571&show_artwork=true&maxwidth=500&maxheight=750

I’m writing this post for stay-at-home artists, especially women artists who sacrifice so much to look after their families. It can be a struggle for someone who is used to performing on stage and collaborating with many different people to suddenly be alone and “confined” at home. Yet I can assure you that being at […]

via Music At Home — Danielle Rosaria, violinist

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“SYNCOPATED CLASSIC”: GREG RUBY AND THE RHYTHM RUNNERS PLAY FRANK D. WALDRON

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 10, 2017

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gregrubymusic/syncopated-classic-the-lost-work-of-a-1920s-jazz-c/widget/video.html

Frank D. Waldron wasn’t well-known outside the Seattle area, but the music he composed nearly a century ago is memorable. Greg Ruby and the Rhythm Runners have brought Waldron’s quirky, lively music to life on a new CD. As Greg tells us in the video above, Waldron’s music is an unearthed treasure. And the band he […]

via “SYNCOPATED CLASSIC”: GREG RUBY AND THE RHYTHM RUNNERS PLAY FRANK D. WALDRON — JAZZ LIVES

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Beethoven String Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op. 131

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 8, 2017

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Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center

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Art Of Composing – The Process of Composing: Pre-Composition

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 7, 2017

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Art of Composing

 

Nile Rodgers reveals 2017 Songwriters Hall of Fame inductees

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 6, 2017

Why So Many Songwriters Start By Working Out Chords

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 4, 2017

The basic mood your songs convey is one of the most important aspects of songwriting. Before anyone figures out even what your song is about, they can pick up a mood pretty quickly. And the one element that often conveys mood quicker than any other is the chord progression. That, in a nutshell, is why so many songwriters…

via Why So Many Songwriters Start By Working Out Chords — The Essential Secrets of Songwriting

Of signs and symbols

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 4, 2017

There has been a lively response to this article in The Guardian and I was happy to add my name to a list of signatories on an open letter in response written by pianist and musicologist Ian Pace (who is still collecting names – as I write, I understand Sir Simon Rattle has asked to […]

via Of signs and symbols — The Cross-Eyed Pianist

How to use the Altered scale in jazz and bebop

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 3, 2017

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Joseph Alexander

 

Overcoming Composer’s Block – Art of Composing

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 3, 2017

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Art of Composing

 

Memorising music away from the piano during lessons

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 3, 2017

My biggest teaching challenge My biggest teaching challenge for some time now, has been focus issues and getting beginner level students to make connections between related concepts being taught in piano class. Every year, I study and work on some aspect of piano playing, in an effort to improve the quality of my teaching, and of […]

via Memorising music away from the piano during lessons — eliza says

Classical music’s $27 billion market opportunity

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 2, 2017

Deep Listening is a form of meditation. Attention is directed to the interplay of sounds and silences or sound/silence continuum. Sound is not limited to musical or speaking sounds but is inclusive of all perceptible vibrations (sonic formations). The practice is intended to expand consciousness to the whole space/time continuum of sound/silences.That extract is from…

via Classical music’s $27 billion market opportunity — On An Overgrown Path

GARY EWER – Why Hooks Are So Important To Pop Songs

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 1, 2017

It’s only taken me about a year and a half, but I finally have a new songwriting video up. “Why Hooks Are So Important To Pop Songs ” is an introductory view of song hooks – what they are, and their fundamental characteristics. The video actually serves as a good introduction to more in-depth look…

via New Video: Why Hooks Are So Important To Pop Songs — The Essential Secrets of Songwriting

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12 Tone Music Newsletter 03/30/17 ~ by Mike Overly

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on March 30, 2017

You’re gonna wanna read this latest 12 Tone Music Newsletter ~ Music’s Cassette Tape Revival ~ written by GRAMMY® Nominated Music Educator and author of Guitar and Bass EncycloMedia Mike Overly . . . http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs139/1119235923778/archive/1123179919445.html Order now through April 7, 2017 to receive FREE SHIPPING on all products in the 12tonemusic.com store by GRAMMY® Nominated Music […]

via 12 Tone Music Newsletter 03/30/17 ~ by Mike Overly — 12tonemusic

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