Jazz Video Guy
Published on Aug 13, 2017

Wes in Paris: https://amzn.to/2q1VZ1A Wes Montgomery Guitar Play-A-Long https://amzn.to/2PJyGom Wes Montgomery: Guitar, Pim Jacobs: Piano; Ruud Jacobs: Bass; Han Bennink: Drums

John Leslie “Wes” Montgomery (March 6, 1923 – June 15, 1968) was an American jazz guitarist. He is widely considered one of the major jazz guitarists, emerging after such seminal figures as Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian and influencing countless others. Montgomery was known for an unusual technique of plucking the strings with the side of his thumb which granted him a distinctive sound.

He often worked with organist Jimmy Smith, and with his brothers Buddy (piano and vibes) and Monk (bass guitar). His recordings up to 1965 were generally oriented towards hard bop, soul jazz and post bop, while circa 1965 he began recording more pop-oriented instrumental albums that featured less improvisation but found mainstream success. His later-career guitar style is a major influence on fusion and smooth jazz.

Percussion Masterclass

August 14, 2019

Alex Woolf – Composer

August 12, 2019

Golden Rhapsody – flute & piano – Sir James Galway , flute

Interview with Alex Woolf, composer of “Music”

Alex Woolf: Cantata (percussion quartet) – Colin Currie, conductor

Spitfire Audio
Published on Jul 24, 2019

Learn more about Eric Whitacre Choir: http://bit.ly/2YruLos Grammy-winning composer and conductor Eric Whitacre shares how he approaches composing for choir.

Watch Eric’s Deep Field film: https://deepfieldfilm.com/

Brilliant Classics
Published on Apr 18, 2017

Bringing together all seven of Schubert’s completed symphonies, as well as the much-loved B minor ‘Unfinished’, this set charts the development of Schubert’s voice as a symphonist. His first six symphonies were composed between 1813 and 1818 for the orchestra at the religious school that he attended in Vienna. Although they could be considered to be apprentice works, and are clearly influenced by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and – in the case of the Sixth Symphony – Rossini, they are remarkable achievements for such a young composer, and the listener can hear some of the hallmarks of Schubert’s more forward-looking, romantic style, such as a bolder and richer harmonic language, beginning to emerge. After a serious illness in 1822, from which he only partially recovered, Schubert composed his final symphonic masterpieces, the ‘Unfinished’ (1822) and the ‘Great’ (1825–6). From the haunting slow introduction and the extraordinary sense of pathos of the ‘Unfinished’ to the joyful and rhythmically vital ‘Great’ symphony, both works showcase Schubert the symphonist at the peak of his powers and are some of the most popular and enduring pieces in the orchestral canon. Schubert’s complete symphonies are performed here by the legendary Staatskapelle Dresden under the inspired direction of celebrated conductor Herbert Blomstedt, praised by Gramophone for his “incomparably refined sensitivity and canny interpretative prowess”. Other information: – Recordings made between 1978 and 1981 at the Lukaskirche in Dresden. – “Probably the finest, most consistent Schubert cycles available” (David Hurwitz, Classicstoday.com, performance: 10).   00:00:00

Symphony No. 1 in D Major, D. 82: I. Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:10:15 Symphony No. 1 in D Major, D. 82: II. Andante 00:18:57 Symphony No. 1 in D Major, D. 82: III. Menuetto. Allegro 00:25:06 Symphony No. 1 in D Major, D. 82: IV. Allegro vivace 00:31:41 Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, D. 125: I. Largo – Allegro vivace 00:42:10 Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, D. 125: II. Andante 00:51:04 Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, D. 125: III. Menuetto. Allegro vivace 00:54:48 Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, D. 125: IV. Presto vivace 01:00:43 Symphony No. 3 in D Major, D. 200: I. Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 01:10:22 Symphony No. 3 in D Major, D. 200: II. Allegretto 01:14:50 Symphony No. 3 in D Major, D. 200: III. Menuetto. Vivace 01:18:57 Symphony No. 3 in D Major, D. 200: IV. Presto vivace 01:23:44 Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, D. 417 ‘Tragic’: I. Adagio molto 01:33:32 Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, D. 417 ‘Tragic’: II. Andante 01:43:05 Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, D. 417 ‘Tragic’: III. Menuetto. Allegro vivace 01:46:25 Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, D. 417 ‘Tragic’: IV. Allegro 01:54:09 Symphony No. 5 in B-Flat Major, D. 485: I. Allegro 02:01:20 Symphony No. 5 in B-Flat Major, D. 485: II. Andante con moto 02:12:09 Symphony No. 5 in B-Flat Major, D. 485: III. Menuetto. Allegro molto 02:17:22 Symphony No. 5 in B-Flat Major, D. 485: IV. Allegro vivace 02:23:20 Symphony No. 6 in C Major, D. 589: I. Adagio – Allegro 02:31:21 Symphony No. 6 in C Major, D. 589: II. Andante 02:37:44 Symphony No. 6 in C Major, D. 589: III. Scherzo. Presto 02:44:04 Symphony No. 6 in C Major, D. 589: IV. Allegro moderato 02:53:32 Symphony No. 8 in B Minor, D.759 ‘Die Unvollendete’: I. Allegro moderato 03:05:05 Symphony No. 8 in B Minor, D.759 ‘Die Unvollendete’: II. Andante con moto 03:17:47 Symphony No. 9 in C Major, Op. posth., D. 944 ‘The Great’: I. Andante – Allegro ma non troppo 03:32:30 Symphony No. 9 in C Major, Op. posth., D. 944 ‘The Great’: II. Andante con moto 03:48:24 Symphony No. 9 in C Major, Op. posth., D. 944 ‘The Great’: III. Scherzo. Allegro vivace 03:59:21 Symphony No. 9 in C Major, Op. posth., D. 944 ‘The Great’: IV. Finale. Allegro vivace Artist: Staatskappelle Dresden Herbert Blomstedt cunductor

Gary Ewer
Published on Jan 16, 2019

See Gary Ewer’s songwriting ebooks: http://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/p…. And check out “The Essential Secrets of Songwriting” blog at http://www.secretsofsongwriting.com

If you check out “Greatest Songs Ever” lists, you’ll almost always notice that the majority of the songs are there, at least in part, because of their excellent lyrics. In this video, we take a look at five characteristics of what makes a lyric great. You’ll learn about style of writing, emotional content, imagery, and much more. If you feel inspired to take your lyric writing to a higher level, start with the basics as described here in this video.

Jazz|ᴳᴿᴱᴱᴺ
Published on Mar 26, 2014

Michel Petrucciani – Full Length Concerts – http://bit.ly/1smggLE

Richard Atkinson
Published on May 15, 2016

Richard Atkinson analyzes the incredible finale of Mozart’s K. 590 Quartet. This is a fair use commentary that uses excerpts from a recording by the Quartetto Italiano.

Andrew Schartmann
Published on Apr 18, 2013

For more: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

This video provides a basic formal analysis of the Grave; Allegro di molto e con brio from Beethoven’s Op. 13 (“Pathétique”). Please note that it is part of a larger project to provide formal analyses of all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas, so check back frequently for updates.

, Visit http://www.andrewschartmann.com/beeth… for more detailed comments.

whsaptheory
Published on Apr 2, 2012

Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA

Spitfire Audio
ublished on Jun 8, 2019

Libraries used in this demo:

Sacconi Strings: http://bit.ly/2XAsS4w

compose music for a string quartet.

cello644
Published on Jan 4, 2015

Cello Sonata No.3 in A Major , op.69 (L.V.Beethoven)

Cello:Yo-Yo Ma Piano:

Emanuel Ax 1985.11.28 

Tokyo.Japan

George N. Gianopoulos
ublished on Apr 23, 2018

Paul Dukas – Fanfare pour Précéder La Péri for Brass Ensemble (1912)

Amadeus Radio
Published on Jan 29, 2019

InMusicTheory

Published on Jan 15, 2013

Music theory analysis of student work in 4-part chorale style harmonization in which passing chords are used: V6 and vii6. Also used is a Deceptive Cadence in inversion: V42 to vi64. Good work here. Discussion by David Gomez.

Playing Parallel Fourths

July 14, 2019

MangoldProject
Published on Jun 14, 2019 MangoldProject

Some Hank Jones, doing his thing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Sbp2…

Last week we’ve discussed using stacks of fourths in the context of harmony, but they can be equally useful when constructing melodies! Here I’m going to point out they can be used to play melody lines as well, with quite a distinctive, modal sound. To do this, I’ll play an excerpt out of a Hank Jones piece and we’ll discuss it briefly.

MangoldProject
Published on Apr 15, 2017

Tritone substitutions refer to changing a dominant chord for another dominant chord a tritone away. A tritone is simply a musical interval equal to six semitones. In this video I’m going to show you why this works and then present a few examples – using both chord progressions and soloing – the demonstrate where you might use this in musical context.