Steven Cohen – Topic
ublished on Aug 27, 2018

Provided to YouTube by CDBaby

Andrew Schartmann
Published on Apr 18, 2013

For more: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

This video provides a basic formal analysis of the Grave; Allegro di molto e con brio from Beethoven’s Op. 13 (“Pathétique”). Please note that it is part of a larger project to provide formal analyses of all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas, so check back frequently for updates.

, Visit http://www.andrewschartmann.com/beeth… for more detailed comments.

Brilliant Classics
Published on Jun 18, 2019

This album contains a musical portrait of Johannes Brahms in piano works from his early and later years, presented by Piano Classics, a label of Brilliant Classics

Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play): https://PianoClassics.lnk.to/PianoSon…

Available for licensing: https://www.brilliantclassicslicensin…

More Information: https://www.piano-classics.com/articl…

Social media: Facebook: https://PianoClassics.lnk.to/Facebook Instagram: https://brilliant-classics.lnk.to/Ins…

*

Every bar of the Sonata burns with longing and passion thwarted, even the Andante tellingly prefaced with lines from the Romantic poet Sternau: ‘The twilight falls, the moonlight gleams, two hearts in love unite, embraced in rapture’. Almost four decades later, Brahms signed off as a composer with the more subtle and even playful spirit of a sublimely allusive quartet of opus numbers, the three Intermezzi Op.117, the seven Fantasias Op.116 and the two sets of mixed genre-pieces that make up Opp. 118 and 119.

These demand the most refined command of phrasing and harmony – at points they come closer than any other work of Brahms to casting loose from the anchor of tonality and anticipating the world of Schoenberg, for whom Brahms was an exemplar – and are eminently suited to a pianist such as Kopachevsky who has already proved himself at home in the twilit world of Liszt and Scriabin, in music on the brink of extinction. A richly rewarding release for all lovers of Romantic piano music and another feather in the cap of a superb young pianist.

Philipp Kopachevsky made his Piano Classics debut in 2016 with an ambitious selection of late Scriabin and Liszt, and Bryce Morrison in Gramophone was impressed: ‘haunting in confidentiality… no less powerful in storm and stress… never less than sensitive.’

Composer: Johannes Brahms

Artist: Philipp Kopachevsky (piano)

*

Tracklist: Piano Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 5: 00:00:00 I. Allegro maestoso 00:09:52 II. Andante espressivo 00:20:46 III. Scherzo, allegro energico 00:25:35 IV. Intermezzo, andante molto 00:29:17 V. Finale, allegro moderato ma rubato 3 Intermezzi, Op. 117: 00:36:30 I. Andante moderato in E-Flat Major 00:42:11 II. Andante non troppo in B-Flat Minor 00:47:24 III. Andante con moto in C-Sharp Minor 17 Fantasien, Op. 116: 00:54:07 I. Capriccio in D Minor. Presto energico 00:56:29 II. Intermezzo in A Minor. Andante 01:00:27 III. Capriccio in G Minor. Allegro passionate 01:03:32 IV. Intermezzo in E Major. Adagio 01:08:12 V. Intermezzo in E Minor. Andante con grazia ed intimissimo sentiment 01:10:58 VI. Intermezzo in E Major. Andantino teneramente 01:14:05 VII. Capriccio in D Minor. Allegro agitato 6 Klavierstücke, Op. 118: 01:16:17 I. Intermezzo in A Minor. Allegro non assai 01:18:15 II. Intermezzo in A Major. Andante teneramente 01:24:22 III. Ballade in G Minor. Allegro energico 01:27:54 IV. Intermezzo in F Minor. Allegretto un poco agitato 01:30:29 V. Romanze in F Major. Andante 01:34:41 VI. Intermezzo in E-Flat Minor. Andante, largo e mesto 4 Klavierstücke, Op. 119: 01:40:47 I. Intermezzo in B Minor. Adagio 01:44:33 II. Intermezzo in E Minor. Andantino un poco agitato 01:49:25 III. Intermezzo in C Major. Grazioso e giocoso 01:51:09 IV. Rhapsodie in E-Flat Major. Allegro risoluto

 

 

 

 

 

Published on May 31, 2018
Bela Bartok – Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110, BB 115 (1937) Sir Georg Solti & Murray Perahia, pianos Dame Evelyn Glennie and David Corkhill, percussionSupport this YouTube Channel: https://www.patreon.com/georgengianop…

 

 

 

Published on Apr 15, 2012

Nicole Esposito and Horacio Parravicini, flutes Jean-Jacques Naudot Sonata for two flutes Adagio Allegro Sarabande Allegro University of Iowa April 14, 2012

DUANE:   An emotionally rich performance; great clarity, perfect ensemble unity!

 

 

Published on Apr 6, 2017

S-VHS → PC 1st [0:27] 2nd [10:32] 3rd [14:58] 4th [22:18] Anne-Sophie Mutter [vn] Lambert Orkis [pf] 1989.12.9 Tokyo. Japan Live

 

Published on Apr 6, 2017

S-VHS → PC 1st [0:27] 2nd [10:32] 3rd [14:58] 4th [22:18] Anne-Sophie Mutter [vn] Lambert Orkis [pf] 1989.12.9 Tokyo. Japan Live

 

 

Saint-Saens Bassoon Sonata:

 

 

Published on Dec 19, 2016

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Chamber Soloists play Paul Hindemith. Bassoon Sonata (1938) – Helma van den Brinck, Bassoon; Sepp Grotenhuis, Piano;

Published on Nov 11, 2014

This video analyzes and explains important musical characteristics of the third movement of Mozart’s Piano Sonata in A Major, K. 331, “Alla Turca,” including its structure and themes. A piano performance is also included.

 

 
MVT I EXPOSITION
00:00 – Theme Group 1, Motif A (Rising Arpeggio)
00:14 – TG1, Motif B (Scalar Passage, with notes in groups of 2)
00:18 – TG1, Motif C (Turn)
00:24 – Counterstatement of TG 1, entering in a surprise E6, the dominant of III
00:37 – Motif B
00:48 – Transition (or an extension of TG 1): Motif A rising in bass, answered by Motif C in RH. Surprisingly substantial.
01:06 – Theme Group 2, Theme 1 (= Motif B!, with Motif C in the LH.) A minor.
01:18 – TG2, Theme 2 (= Motif C, with lengthened 2nd note)
01:26 – TG2, Theme 2, with Motif C now in the deep bass
01:31 – TG2, Theme 3 (Cadential Theme) DEVELOPMENT
03:51 – Motif A, repeated thrice, arriving in F#
04:37 – Transition Theme (Motif A + C), sequentially deployed, rising constantly
04:58 – 22(!) bars of dominant preparation, totally devoid of any thematic allusion. Short recitative (with a little Neapolitan Eb) leads into RECAPITULATION
05:19 – TG1, with 4 bars of recitative attached to each statement of the largo. This section hangs on a Ab, which is transformed
06:43 – into a G# (in enharmonic implied Gb minor!) in a darkly guttural 4 chords. This ushers in a extraordinary modulating section.
06:55 – TG2, in tonic.
07:36 – CODA MVT II EXPOSITION
07:59 – Theme 1. (Motif A = rising double-dotted 3-note figure)
09:38 – Transition, with stately rising theme. (Motif B = drumroll in bass) 10:55 – Theme 2. At
11:42 Motif B enters, building into dominant minor 9th chord RECAPITULATION 12:08 – Theme 1, with Motif A immediately used as inner voice.
At 13:00 a demisemiquaver accompaniment drifts down the keyboard 13:42 – Transition
14:54 – Theme 2 CODA
15:42 – Motif B, again building into a dominant minor 9th
16:26 – Motif A, rounded-off, in LH then RH
16:45 – Recalling Theme 1
17:19 – A new, 2-bar long 3rd theme enters and is repeated in the middle voice, before the movement ends. MVT III EXPOSITION
18:06 – Theme Group 1, Theme 1. A single motif (Motif A) repeated 16 times in RH. Note codetta with chromatic descending line
18:29 – Transition. Theme 1 in bass, interspersed with arpeggiated figure
18:38 – Theme Group 2, Theme 1, entering with insistent hemiola and 6 bars of dominant harmony
18:55 – TG2, Theme 2
19:05 – TG2, Theme 3 (Cadential Theme) DEVELOPMENT
20:26 – Motif A in dim7 of iv, modulating into A min 20:37 – The bass uses Motif A to climb up a dim7 in D min, then shifts to D min harmony, then shifts into C min by flattening the A and introducing the inversion of Motif A in the RH. Then movement into the dim7 of Bb min
20:54 – Dramatic entrance of inverted A motif in RH, while LH climbs up bass chromatically.
21:06 – TG1 Theme 1, in Bb min
21:12 – Chromatic rising, landing on a dominant 7, suddenly revealed
21:19 – to be a augmented 6th when it resolves into the dominant of D min 21:23 – Dominant preparation begins, oscillating between G min and D min
21:41 – 16 bars of continuous descent to the home dominant RECAPITULATION
21:53 – TG1, Theme 1. The bII in bar 18 becomes the subdominant of Bb, introduction a surprisingly lyrical passage.
22:14 – Transition. Tonal movement around circle of 5ths. G min harmony becomes augmented 6th chord, leading back into
22:34 – D min, TG2. Note how at
23:00 (Theme 3) Beethoven omits the expected high G, since his piano didn’t have the note, and substitutes a really nice repetition of the high D instead. CODA
23:12 – Mimicking the beginning of the development, without forte outbursts 23:21 – for 16 bars(!) we dwell on the dominant, leading to
23:33 – a violent restatement of TG1 Theme 1, with an A pedal in the highest registers 23:54 – The original codetta from Theme 1 is now presented in full. With another familiar tonic-dominant swing the sonata ends.

 

Published on May 23, 2016

00:00 – I. Allegro
10:27 – II. Adagio ma non troppo
18:08 – III. Andante – Allegretto
Pf. Gloria Cheng
Lutosławski’s Piano Sonata, the only composition preserved from his early student years, was completed on 29 December 1934. That three-movement work was modelled on the music of Debussy and – to a certain extent – Ravel (especially his Sonatine). The composer himself acknowledged Szymanowski’s influences. The rich palette of sound colours reveals impressionistic origins and, in most of the Sonata (and especially its first movement), the basis of the timbre is the quick succession of broken chords, providing, by means of the pedal, a glimmering background for the subjects and independent motives. The Sonata places certain technical demands on the pianist . In order to perform it correctly, considerable dexterity is required as well as a mastery of passage-work and octave technique, sensitivity to instrumental colouring and skill in bringing polyphony into prominence vividly. In later years Lutosławski’s attitude towards his youthful Sonata was so critical that, though the manuscript survived the turmoil of war, he never decided to publish it. In the 1970s Ryszard Bakst acquired a copy of the music and recorded it for Polish Radio, albeit against the wishes of the composer. Danuta Gwizdalanka, Krzysztof Meyer (excerpt from the book Lutosławski. A Road to Mastery)

 

Sihyeon Choe 

 

olla-vogala 

Published on Jan 11, 2016

– Composer: Carl Vine, AO (8 October 1954 — present)
– Performer: Michael Kieran Harvey
– Year of recording: 1991

Piano Sonata No. 1, written in 1990.

00:00 – I. [no dynamic tempo marking]
08:23 – II. Leggiero e legato

Australian composer Carl Vine uses a lot of open fourths and fifths in this piano sonata, and chords/arpeggios are often based on stacked fourths or fifths. The sonata is reminiscent in its form of Elliot Carter’s piano sonata, and in its intensity of Samuel Barber’s piano sonata.

Notes by the dedicatee, Michael Harvey:
“Drawing on the lithe beauty and contrapuntal elegance of the earlier Piano Sonata (1946) by Elliot Carter, the [1st] Piano Sonata by Carl Vine is a work characterised by intense rhythmic drive and the building up of layers of resonance. These layers are sometimes delicate and modal, archieving a ‘pointed’ polyphony by the use of complex cross-rhythm, at other times they are granite-like in density, creating waves of sound which propel the music irresistibly towards its climax.

The scheme is similar to the Carter Sonata – Two movements, with the slow section built into and defining the faster portions of the first movement. The second movement is based on a ‘moto perpetuo’ which soon gives way to a chorale section, based on parallel fifths.

In discussing the work, Vine is reticent about offering explanations for the compositional processes involved, feeling that these are self-evident, and indeed the work is definitely aurally ‘accessible’ on first hearing. However one of the main concerns in this sonata is the inter-relationship between disparate tempi, which is the undercurrent of the work and its principle binding element.

The work is dedicated to me and was commissioned by the Sydney Dance Company to be choreographed by Graeme Murphy. The first concert performance of this work was on 23 June 1991 in Melbourne. The first dance performance of Piano Sonata was in the Drama Theatre of the Sydney Opera House in May, 1992.”

 

*

The Daily Beethoven

*
(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels)

Piano Sonata No.23 in Fm, Op.57 (‘Appassionata’)
1.Allegro assai @0:00
2.Andante con moto (attaca) @9:06
3.Allegro ma non troppo @15:33

Piano: Annie Fischer

(Version with Alfred Brendel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89hcfg…)

Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer.

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…

Introduction to Sonata Form:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/abou…

This analysis was assisted in large part by Donald Tovey’s “Companion to Beethoven’s Pianoforte Sonatas”.

My Analysis Cheat Sheet:
-SONATA FORM: Most common form, almost always in the 1st movement and often last movement of a work. The basic sequence is Intro, Exposition, Development, Recapitulation and Coda.
-EXPOSITION: Main theme(s) are presented, usually in the home key and then a modulated key
-THEME / THEME GROUP: musical “paragraph”. These can be broken down into 1 or more “tunes”. These are grouped according to key and end on cadences. The 1st Theme Group is in the home key. The 2nd Theme Group is in the dominant or other key.
-CLOSING/CADENCE SECTION: a theme group which closes the Expo or Recap (it follows the 2nd theme) and revives Theme 1 to provide closure.
-MODULATING BRIDGE/TRANSITION: material to get from 1 key/theme group to another, often w sequencing.
-DEVELOPMENT: free-form “working out”/”fantasia” section where earlier themes are subjected to variations and atomizations. Possibly a new theme is introduced (“Eroica”).
-RECAPITULATION: Repeat of the Expo, except that this section remains in the same key throughout and there can be theme variations from the initial Expo versions of themes.
-CODA: Follows the Recap, kind of a second development designed to finish off the work.
-SEQUENCING: repeating a phrase on different starting notes (keys)
-TERNARY FORM: 3-part form in A-B-A, usually a Scherzo or Minuet
-SCHERZO/MINUET: 1st pt. of a 3-pt. Scherzo form, usually AA.BA’.BA’ in 3/4 time. Lively.
-TRIO: Middle section of a Scherzo movement, slower, broader than the Scherzo section
-RONDO: Similar to Sonata form except that the Development is replaced by a new section and there is less transition material. A principal theme (A) alternates with contrasting themes (BCD…). (Ex.ABACABA.)
-FUGUE: form in which a subject(s) undergoes canonical permutations
-VARIATION: repeat of a theme with variation
-CADENZA: unaccompanied instrumental solo
-BINARY FORM: Structure in AB. 2-Part Song form.
(Disclaimer: I do not have a music degree, all of the above is purely from memory and observation)