MultiPianoIsrael

WATCH “MultiPiano” OTHER VIDEOS AT: http://multipianoisrael.com/ “MultiPiano” Ensemble: Tomer Lev, Berenika Glixman, Daniel Borovitzky, Raviv Leibzirer Tel Aviv Soloists Ensemble / Barak Tal – Conductor Live / Israel Conservatory Hall, Tel Aviv / October 2013

ABOUT “MULTIPIANO”: “MultiPiano” is a unique keyboard project, presenting four of Israel’s virtuoso pianists in a celebration of pianos in ever-changing combinations – from one to four pianos, from 4 to 8 hands, with or without orchestra. The ensemble’s repertoire ranges from fully-fledged original masterworks to dazzling virtuoso arrangements.

Now in its fourth year, the ensemble has already performed on four continents, from Beijing Concert Hall to Buenos Aires’ Teatro Colon, from New-York’s Merkin Hall to London’s Henri Wood Hall, collaborating with such institutions as the English Chamber Orchestra, the Israel Chamber Orchestra, Buenos Aires Mozarteum Argentino and Conciertos Grapa, the Philharmonic Society of Lima, the music festivals of Taipei, Huallien, Ottawa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, as well as on television and radio networks from Asia to South America.

The MultiPiano project was launched in the 2010-11 season under the umbrella of the Buchmann-Mehta School of Music – a joint institution of Tel Aviv University and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. Featuring three of Israel`s most radiant young pianists and their mentor, Tomer Lev – one of the country’s most prominent musicians – the MultiPiano project attracted much international attention immediately upon its inauguration. In 2011 the group successfully toured the Far East, with performances in Beijing, Taipei, Kaohshiung and Tainan, including a Gala opening of the Kuandu Festival in Taiwan in cooperation with the Israeli Foreign Ministry.

In summer 2012 the group was presented throughout Latin America’s foremost concert halls in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Peru, including Teatro Colon and the Gran Rex (Buenos Aires), Teatro Del Sodre (Montevideo) and a live broadcast performance in Radio Nacional of Argentina, televised by PBS (TV Publica). Additional presentations included performances for the respected Mozarteum Argentino concert agency, The Philharmonic Society of Lima (opening concert of the Jubilee Festival), Sao Paulo Friends of Tel Aviv University, and concerts in Rosario and Cordoba. Shortly thereafter the group performed for the second time in the Far East (Taipei and Hualien International Music Festival).


In spring of 2013 MultiPiano was presented at the Felicja Blumental Music Festival in Tel Aviv and the Israel Festival in Jerusalem, including solo performances with the Israel Chamber Orchestra (Bach-Vivaldi concerto for 4 pianos) and live broadcasts for Israel Radio (IBA). The Tel Aviv Soloists, Haifa Symphony and the Israel Netanya Kibbutz orchestras hosted MultiPiano for performances of Bach, Mozart, Poulenc and Levanon concerti for 2, 3 and 4 pianos. In addition, the ensemble had its third tour to the Far East (Beijing Concert Hall, Tienjin Grand Theatre, Chengdu Music Hall ).


In fall 2013 MultiPiano was presented in two North American tours, including performances at Merkin Hall in New York City, as well as in Montreal, Ottawa, and Chicago. The New York Times described their performance as “a celebration of Multi-hands and Multi-keyboards”.

In Spring 2014 the ensemble toured South America for the second time, as soloists with the Israel Netanya Kibbutz Chamber Orchestra, with concerts in Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Lima and Bogota. In Fall 2014 MultiPiano collaborated with the English Chamber Orchestra in a recording of Mozart Concertos for two and three pianos, as well as in a world premiere recording of Mozart’s “Larghetto and Allegro” – a 1781 fragment left unfinished and completed and orchestrated by Tomer Lev for two pianos and orchestra.

Bryan Barajas

Published on Dec 27, 2017

Andras Schiff: Prom 2017- Well Tempered Clavier- C=256hz.

Why C=256hz?

Original tuning at A=440Hz: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duKtg…

From our Classical Renaissance webpage: https://larouchepac.com/classical-ren…

“Since France has adopted a standard pitch, I advised that the example should also be followed by us; and I formally requested that the orchestras of various cities of Italy, among them that of the Scala [Milan], to lower the tuning fork to conform to the standard French one. If the musical commission instituted by our government believes, for mathematical exigencies, that we should reduce the 435 vibrations of French tuning fork to 432, the difference is so small, almost imperceptible to the ear, that I associate myself most willingly with this. It would be a grave, extremely grave error, to adopt, as proposed from Rome, a standard pitch of 450!!! I also am of the opinion with you that the lowering of the tuning in no way takes away the sonority or liveliness of the execution; but gives on the contrary, something more noble, of greater fullness and majesty that the shrieks a too high tuning fork could give. For my part, I would like a single tuning to be adopted in the whole musical world. The musical language is universal: Why then would the note which has the name ‘A’ in Paris or Milan have to become a B-flat in Rome?” -G. Verdi, 1881

Klavdy B

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Arabella Steinbacher & Akiko Suwanai – J.S.Bach The Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings and Continuo in D Minor, BWV 1043/Doppelkonzert für zwei Violinen d-Moll BWV 1043

Arabella Miho Steinbacher, premier violon
Akiko Suwanai, second violon

Strings and Continuo:
Sergey Khachatryan,Manrico Padovani,Yuki Manuela Janke,Kazuhide Isomura,Danjuro Ishizaka,Maggie Cole

Encounter with Stradivari by Nippon(Japan) Music Foundation

Caballerito de Arratia

Primera parte de Grandes Obras para órgano de Johann Sebastian Bach,

interpretadas por Hans-André Stamm.

Алик Соболевский

counterpoint85

Sir John Eliot Gardiner conducts the Monteverdi Choir and the English Baroque Soloists in a performance of Bach’s Christmas Oratorio BWV 248 to begin their year long Cantata Pilgrimage.

Part I ‘For the First Day of Christmas’
Part II ‘For the Second Day of Christmas’
Part III ‘For the Third Day of Christmas’
Part IV ‘For the Feast of the Circumcision’
Part V ‘For the First Sunday in the New Year’
Part VI ‘For the Feats of Epiphany’

The Christmas Oratorio

Sir John Eliot Gardiner chose to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the death of Johann Sebastian Bach in his own inimitable style: with the Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists he undertook an extended concert tour to perform the composer’s entire known output of sacred cantatas at churches and concert halls all over Europe. The tour began at the Herderkirche in Weimar, where on 23rd and 27th December 1999 all six parts of the Christmas Oratorio were performed and recorded.

Bach’s “Oratorio Performed Musically During the Holy Christmas Season in Both Principal Churches in Leipzig” – as the inscription on the printed libretto states – was written at the end of the year 1734/35. The “oratorio” is in fact a grouping of six cantatas and Bach intended the individual works to be performed on six separate feast days between Christmas and Epiphany. But in calling the piece an oratorio, is it possible that Bach perhaps intended a complete performance at a later date? This is unlikely. As the celebreated Bach scholar Albert Schweitzer wisely remarks, there is little to be gained by performing the entire oratorio in a single evening, since “the weary listener would be in no state to appreciate the beauty of the second part.” A more plausible theory, perhaps, is that it was easier to sell a compilation of cantatas rather than individual copies. But Bach’s real motives will probably remain hidden.

From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christma…

The Christmas Oratorio (German: Weihnachtsoratorium) BWV 248, is an oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach intended for performance in church during the Christmas season. It was written for the Christmas season of 1734 incorporating music from earlier compositions, including three secular cantatas written during 1733 and 1734 and a now lost church cantata, BWV 248a. The date is confirmed in Bach’s autograph manuscript. The next performance was not until 17 December 1857 by the Sing-Akademie zu Berlin under Eduard Grell. The Christmas Oratorio is a particularly sophisticated example of parody music. The author of the text is unknown, although a likely collaborator was Christian Friedrich Henrici (Picander).

The work belongs to a group of three oratorios written towards the end of Bach’s career in 1734 and 1735 for major feasts, the others being the Ascension Oratorio (BWV 11) and the Easter Oratorio (BWV 249). All include a tenor Evangelist as narrator and parody earlier compositions, although the Christmas Oratorio is by far the longest and most complex work.

The oratorio is in six parts, each part being intended for performance on one of the major feast days of the Christmas period. The piece is often presented as a whole or split into two equal parts. The total running time for the entire work is nearly three hours. In a similar fashion to Bach’s other oratorios, a tenor Evangelist narrates the story.

The first part (for Christmas Day) describes the Birth of Jesus, the second (for December 26) the annunciation to the shepherds, the third (for December 27) the adoration of the shepherds, the fourth (for New Year’s Day) the circumcision and naming of Jesus, the fifth (for the first Sunday after New Year) the journey of the Magi, and the sixth (for Epiphany) the adoration of the Magi.

Kanál uživatele AchillesValda

Rosalyn Tureck – piano, recorded 1962

Vikingur Olafsson

 

Vikingur Olafsson

Víkingur Ólafsson recording a CD with Bach’s Partitas and Chopin’s Preludes in Gewandhaus, Leipzig. Art by Hreinn Fridfinnsson

Ozo Shatranj·52 videos

Columbia Symphony Orchestra
dir. Vladimir Golschmann
Glenn Gould: piano
Charles Libove: violin solo

NOTE: The Toccata is mostly homophonic  –  Fugue is Polyphonic.

smalin·225 videos

Any questions about this piece?  Please go to YouTube  Page  and click More.

 

Shahzad Raja·185 videos

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

Part 8

Johann Sebastian Bach[1] (21 March 1685, O.S.31 March 1685, N.S. — 28 July 1750, N.S.) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity.[2] Although he did not introduce new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an unrivalled control of harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France.
Revered for their intellectual depth, technical command and artistic beauty, Bach’s works include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Goldberg Variations, the Partitas, The Well-Tempered Clavier, the Mass in B minor, the St Matthew Passion, the St John Passion, the Magnificat, the Musical Offering, The Art of Fugue, the English and French Suites, the Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin, the Cello Suites, more than 200 surviving cantatas, and a similar number of organ works, including the famous Toccata and Fugue in D minor and Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, and the Great Eighteen Chorale Preludes and Organ Mass.
Bach’s abilities as an organist were highly respected throughout Europe during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest and performances of his music in the first half of the 19th century. He is now generally regarded as one of the main composers of the Baroque style, and as one of the greatest composers of all time.