I Write The Music

MERRY CHRISTMAS – G. F. Handel, The Messiah Oratorio – Lawrence Symphony Orchestra & Choirs

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on December 24, 2018

Lawrence Symphony Orchestra, Viking Chorale, Cantala, Concert Choir Mark Dupere, conductor

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G.F. Handel – Water Music Suite – Music For The Royal Fireworks – BBC Proms 2012

Posted in Composers by Higher Density Blog on September 30, 2015

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Julia Fischer & Daniel Muller-Schott – Handel-Halvorsen Passacaglia (HQ)

Posted in Composers by Higher Density Blog on May 3, 2015

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Concerto Grosso – Torelli, Vivaldi, Handel, Bloch, Schnittke

Posted in Baroque, Concerto Grosso, Modernist, Music, Music Form, Music Reference, Performance by Higher Density Blog on November 2, 2013

Wikipedia:  Concerto Grosso    –

The concerto grosso (Italian for big concert(o), plural concerti grossi) is a form of baroque music in which the musical material is passed between a small group of soloists (the concertino) and full orchestra (the ripieno or tutti). This is in contrast to the concerto which features a single solo instrument with the melody line, accompanied by the orchestra.

The form developed in the late seventeenth century, although the name was not used at first. Alessandro Stradella seems to have written the first music in which two groups of different sizes are combined in the characteristic way. The name was first used by Giovanni Lorenzo Gregori in a set of 10 compositions published in Lucca in 1698.[1]

The first major composer to use the term concerto grosso was Arcangelo Corelli. After Corelli’s death, a collection of twelve of his concerti grossi was published; not long after, composers such as Francesco Geminiani, Pietro Locatelli and Giuseppe Torelli wrote concertos in the style of Corelli. He also had a strong influence on Antonio Vivaldi.

Two distinct forms of the concerto grosso exist: the concerto da chiesa (church concert) and the concerto da camera (chamber concert). (See also Sonata for a discussion about sonatas da camera and da chiesa.) The concerto da chiesa alternated slow and fast movements; the concerto da camera had the character of a suite, being introduced by a prelude and incorporating popular dance forms. These distinctions blurred over time.

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