I Write The Music

AP MUSIC THEORY – Guide for Part Writing, Counterpoint, Composition, Figured Bass, Non Chord Tones

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on June 22, 2018

 

Published on Mar 31, 2013

This video talks about guidelines for successful partwriting and counterpoint Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA LIKE US!! and SHARE and SUBSCRIBE!! https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd…. Thanks for Watching
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What is a Fugue?

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on April 25, 2018

 

 

Published on Feb 18, 2016

In this video, the musical form called a fugue is explained. Feel free to use this video for your own class. Copyright information is at the end of the video. Music Animation Machine: http://www.musanim.com/all/ Attribution 3.0 United States (CC BY 3.0 US): https://creativecommons.org/licenses/… PowToon presentation software you can make online for FREE: http://www.powtoon.com/

 

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Counterpoint…..Modernized — Composing the Score

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 10, 2016

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F230218543&visual=true&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false

If you understand counterpoint, you’d know it was developed mostly during the Renaissance as a way to create individual interesting musical lines within a SATB framework. Essentially each voice of a piece would support the harmony of the composition, yet their contour and rhythm could be totally separate or independent of each other. This technique’s […]

via Counterpoint…..Modernized — Composing the Score

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Counterpoint…..Modernized — Composing the Score

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on July 6, 2016

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F230218543&visual=true&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false

If you understand counterpoint, you’d know it was developed mostly during the Renaissance as a way to create individual interesting musical lines within a SATB framework. Essentially each voice of a piece would support the harmony of the composition, yet their contour and rhythm could be totally separate or independent of each other. This technique’s […]

via Counterpoint…..Modernized — Composing the Score

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Thomas Tallis – Spem in alium (a 40 voices) – Harry Christophers

Posted in Uncategorized by Higher Density Blog on September 3, 2015

What is Counterpoint? – LivingPianosVideos

Posted in Comp Techniques by Higher Density Blog on July 26, 2015
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AP Music Theory – Guide for Part Writing, Counterpoint, Composition, Figured Bass, Non Chord Tones

Posted in Comp Process, Counterpoint by Higher Density Blog on February 24, 2015

whsaptheory

 *

This video talks about guidelines for successful partwriting and counterpoint
Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
LIKE US!! and SHARE and SUBSCRIBE!!
https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory
https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd….

AP Music Theory – Chord Options, Chord Inversion, Harmonic Progression, Bass Line, Counterpoint

Posted in Theory by Higher Density Blog on December 29, 2014

whsaptheory

This video talks about guidelines for choosing chords when given a melodic note.
Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
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https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory
https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd….

Paul Hindemith – Ludus Tonalis

Posted in Composers, Counterpoint, Hindemith by Higher Density Blog on November 29, 2014

ollavogala

– Composer: Paul Hindemith (16 November 1895 — 28 December 1963)
– Performer: Sviatoslav Richter (piano)
– Year of recording: 1985 (live at “Fêtes Musicales en Touraine”, France)

Ludus tonalis, cycle of 25 pieces for piano, written in 1942.

00:00 – 01. Praeludium
04:45 – 02. Fuga 1. in C major (Slow)
07:49 – 03. Interludium (Moderate, with energy)
09:13 – 04. Fuga 2, in G major (Gay)
10:50 – 05. Interludium (Pastorale)
11:52 – 06. Fuga 3, in F major (Andante)
15:33 – 07. Interludium (Scherzando)
16:46 – 08. Fuga 4, in A major (With energy)
20:05 – 09. Interludium (Fast)
21:14 – 10. Fuga 5, in E major (Fast)
22:36 – 11. Interludium (Moderato)
23:53 – 12. Fuga 6, in E flat major (Quiet)
25:57 – 13. Interludium (March)
28:04 – 14. Fuga 7, in A flat major (Moderato)
30:35 – 15. Interludium (Very broad)
33:12 – 16. Fuga 8, in D major (With strength)
34:09 – 17. Interludium (Very fast)
35:46 – 18. Fuga 9, in B flat major (Moderato)
37:58 – 19. Interludium (Very quiet)
40:37 – 20. Fuga 10, in D flat major (Moderately fast
42:24 – 21. Interludium (Allegro pesante)
44:30 – 22. Fuga 11, in B major (Slow)
47:33 – 23. Interludium (Valse)
49:39 – 24. Fuga 12, in F sharp major (Very Quiet)
52:45 – 25. Postludium

The role of the composer in modern society had been a concern for Hindemith even before he explored it dramatically in the operas Cardillac (1926) and Mathis der Maler (1938). Hindemith’s “Gebrauchsmusik” (“utility music,” a term the composer disliked), written to fill a need for high-quality music that could be performed by talented amateurs, was one manifestation of his concerns; another was his interest in the teaching of music, as evidenced in his efforts toward the organization of music education in Turkey, at the behest of that country’s government, in 1937. Hindemith demonstrated his beliefs regarding the politico-ethical responsibilities of the composer when he chose to leave Nazi Germany at the end of the 1930s, eventually settling in the United States as a professor of music at Yale University.

In Ludus tonalis (“Tonal Games”) for solo piano, Hindemith wove together the varied strands of his professional and artistic life up to that point. Hindemith’s subtitle for the work, “Studies in Counterpoint, Tonal Organization and Piano Playing,” perhaps carries a deceptive connotation of dryness or academicism. But Ludus tonalis ranges well beyond the stated intent of its heading, exploring matters of technique, theory, inspiration, and communication. It is in effect, a veritable catalogue of the composer’s mature style, expressed in lively, imaginative, compact vignettes. While a complete performance requires nearly an hour, none of individual parts is longer than four minutes.

Ludus tonalis is ingeniously arranged, its 12 fugues connected by interludes that modulate from the key of one fugue to that of the next. The interludes also serve as a means of thematic modulation; each propagates thematic “cells” that anticipate the material of the succeeding fugue. While the fugues are entirely contrapuntal — often ingeniously so, as when Hindemith creates the effect of three-part polyphony with just two voices — the interludes are homophonic, taking harmony and variety of expression as their major concerns. Framing the whole is a Praeludium and a Postludium; in keeping with the playful suggestion of the title, the latter is a retrograde inversion of the former.

In the Praeludium Hindemith “signs in” with cascading toccata figurations, followed by a meditative arioso and a solemn conclusion of imposing chords over a bell-like descending figure in the bass. This introduction is also a bank of the work’s thematic material, which Hindemith explores throughout with great inventiveness and facility. The Interludes, virtually character pieces, are marked by individual, distinctive personalities. The third, a scherzo, is a funny promenade with a prominent, cheeky Scotch snap; the eighth is notable for its fast, chordal, hand-over-hand pianism; the ninth is quiet and introspective, recalling the composer’s works of mourning. There is also a noteworthy resourcefulness in the fugues, a restrictive form that poses challenges in creating variety. The second fugue is based on an insistent repeated note from which the theme suddenly launches upward, while the jaunty ninth fugue juxtaposes an assertive grace note figure with a motive of four thirty-second notes

AP Music Theory: Guide for Part Writing, Counterpoint, Composition, Figured Bass, Non Chord Tones

Posted in Comp Process, Theory by Higher Density Blog on October 18, 2014

whsaptheory

This video talks about guidelines for successful partwriting and counterpoint
Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
LIKE US!! and SHARE and SUBSCRIBE!!
https://www.youtube.com/user/whsaptheory
https://sites.google.com/a/friscoisd…

 

Bach – Ricercar a 6 – Music Animation

Posted in Bach JS, Comp Process, Counterpoint, Fugue by Higher Density Blog on July 27, 2014

musanim

Six-voice ricercar from J. S. Bach’s Musical Offering, BWV 1079
FAQ

Q: What is a ricercar?
A: See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricercar

Q: Is this the most significant piano work of the last millennium?
A: At least one person thinks so:
http://tinyurl.com/RosenOnBachsSixVoi…

Q: What instrument is that?
A: It’s two instruments, actually: a harpsichord and an organ. The harpsichord is Atema’s “Pristine Harpsichord” (with all stops on); the organ is two Ahlborn-Galanti Archiv modules, using the following stops (in order from the top voice):
Prinzipal 8′
Cor Anglais 8′
Quintade 8′
Flauto Mirabilis 8′
Prinzipal 8′ + Gedackt 8′
Ophicleide 16′ (up an octave so that it’s at pitch)

Q: Where can I get the sheet music for this?
A: Here is Bach’s autograph …
http://www.musanim.com/pdf/bwv1079m2_…
… and here is a modern version …
http://www.musanim.com/pdf/bwv1079m2.pdf

Harold Moses – The Bach Principle – Principles of Counterpoint – Composition Process

Posted in Bach JS, Classical, Comp Process, Composer, Counterpoint, Melody, Presentation by Higher Density Blog on March 9, 2014

MoryaFederation·274 videos

The Vibrational Architecture of Living Together in Harmony.
A talk given at the 27th Annual Conference of the Seven Ray Institute and the University of the Seven Rays.
— “I want to demonstrate to the world the architecture of a new and beautiful social commonwealth. The secret of my harmony? I alone know it. Each instrument in counterpoint, and as many contrapuntal parts as there are instruments. It is the enlightened self-discipline of the various parts, each voluntarily imposing on itself the limits of its individual freedom for the wellbeing of the community. That is my message. Not the autocracy of a single stubborn melody on the one hand, nor the anarchy of the unchecked noise on the other. No, a delicate balance between the two – an enlightened freedom. The science of my art. The harmony of the stars in the heavens. The yearning for brotherhood in the hearts of men. This is the secret of my music.”
~ JS Bach

Harold Grandstaff Moses, Honorary PhDE in Musical Cosmology from the University of the Seven Rays, Director of the Institute of Harmonic Science in Phoenix, Arizona. Harold is a composer, orchestrator, violist, educator, choral director, musical cosmologist, and vibrational theorist. As an experienced guide into the world of sound, music and healing, Harold uses descriptive metaphors and new science examples to reveal the majesty and mystery of vibration, resonance and harmony.

Homophony and Counterpointn – Johann Sebastian Bach – Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

Posted in Bach JS, Counterpoint, Homophonic, Music, Music Form, Musical Form by Higher Density Blog on December 9, 2013

Medieval Counterpoint

Posted in Counterpoint, Melody, Music, Voice by Higher Density Blog on November 15, 2013

AP Music Theory: Four Part Harmony using Roman Numerals – Free Response

Posted in Comp Techniques, Composition, Counterpoint, Harmony, Roman Numeral Chords, Voicings by Higher Density Blog on August 11, 2013

whsaptheory·38 videos

This video talks about the AP Exam Free Response Question 6 using roman numerals with inversions for partwriting.

Produced for WHS AP Music Theory http://goo.gl/vr5mA
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