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In these two video guitar lessons I will demonstrate classical style harmonics for guitar. This harmonic technique is extremely useful no matter what style of music you play.

The first video lesson below demonstrates the basics of how the technique is performed on the guitar. Don’t worry about what type of guitar you are practicing these lessons with. I am using a classical guitar but this technique can be played on any acoustic or electric guitar.

In this first lesson all we are trying to accomplish is sounding a solid harmonic note with a constant bass pedal underneath. This alone can be very challenging in the beginning.

I personally use my picking hand little finger to pluck the harmonic because I feel that it is not only stronger than the ring finger, but the added distance between the little finger and the index finger (which is playing over the harmonic node point) helps the harmonic sound louder. But, if you feel your ring finger feels more secure feel free to use that finger instead. The majority of guitar players actually prefer to use their ring finger.

In this second lesson I will demonstrate how to take this technique to a whole new level by playing an upper melody using the harmonics and a fingerstyle chord progression underneath it. This sounds amazing when it all comes together and can be taken to great heights if practiced sufficiently.

The key here is to keep anything that is not a harmonic in an accompaniment role only. The harmonics will have a difficult time sounding over the natural notes if the natural notes are played to heavily. This isn’t a technique that is usually performed in a loud passage for that very reason.

Take your time and make sure that the harmonics in the first video lesson are solid before attempting the second video lesson. The second video lesson is much more difficult since you have to think about both hands simultaneously in a much more complex fashion than in the first lesson.

There are many popular classical guitar pieces that employ this technique. But even if classical guitar isn’t really your thing, I think you can easily see how useful this technique can be is used with a little bit of imagination.