I Write The Music

Songwriting Secrets – Modulating Between Keys – Using the 2 5 1 Progression

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on October 30, 2015
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Advanced Theory – Harmony | Music Matters

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on October 24, 2015
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AP Music Theory: Music Texture (Polyphony, Biphonic, Heterophonic, Monophonic, Homophonic)

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on October 11, 2015
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AP Music Theory – How to build Seventh Chords 7th

Posted in Chords, Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on September 29, 2015

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Harmony Intervals – Seventh, Octave, Ninth, 11th, 13th Spanish – Guitar School

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on September 27, 2015
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musictheoryguy – Slurs and Ties Explained – Music Theory

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on August 19, 2015

musictheoryguy

AP Music Theory – Review of Minor Scales ( Aeolian – Natural, Harmonic, Melodic)

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on August 8, 2015

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Music Theory Clinic – Repeats – D.C & D.S al Fine

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on August 7, 2015

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Classical Style Harmonics For Guitar

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on July 24, 2015
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Beginner Saxophone Lesson – Major Scales Introduction

Posted in Music Theory, Scales by Higher Density Blog on July 8, 2015
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Analysis of Sonata Form – Mozart: Piano Sonata No. 16 in C

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on July 3, 2015

Keenan Kemper

Professor Wright – Rhythm: Fundamentals

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on June 2, 2015

YaleCourses

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In this lecture, Professor Wright explains the basic system of Western musical notation, and offers an interpretation of its advantages and disadvantages. He also discusses the fundamental principles of rhythm, elaborating upon such concepts as beat, meter, and discussing in some depth the nature of durational patterns in duple and triple meters. The students are taught to conduct basic patterns in these meters through musical examples drawn from Chuck Mangione, Cole Porter, REM, Chopin, and Ravel.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Advantages and Disadvantages of Musical Notation
14:41 – Chapter 2. Beats and Meters
23:09 – Chapter 3. Exercises Distinguishing Duple and Triple Meters
31:27 – Chapter 4. Conducting Basic Meter Patterns: Exercises with REM, Chopin, and Ravel

Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu

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Andrew Wasson – GUITAR THEORY – Jazz Harmony Embellishments

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on May 11, 2015

creativeguitarstudio

Sunday January 04, 2015 at: http://www.andrewwasson.com/

Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question…

Q: For the past three months I’ve been working on trying to play Jazz. Currently, I’m getting into creating melodies over basic Jazz chord changes. What I’d like to get better at is how embellishing and targeting works. Are roots important? Or, should I focus on the 5th, the 3rd or maybe the 7th? And, what should be done regarding extensions (9th, 11th & 13th) and also how do altered tones get targeted? Thank You.
Howard – Buffalo, NY. USA

A: When it comes to Jazz Harmony accents and embellishments, it is important to select the chord tone that will work the best for the particular melody being built. In some certain situations the chord tone for creating a nice resolution, might simply be the 3rd or the 7th. Other times it might be the 5th. If extensions are involved then perhaps the 9th, 11th or 13th will work nicely. And, quite often when it comes to altered chords, the altered ‘augmented or diminished’ chord tones are so distinct that we might find it best to target into them for the melodic embellishment that works best. In the lesson, we’ll explore each of these areas, and through testing each example, we’ll have the chance to notice how each target tone and embellishment affects both harmony and melody.

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Learn Piano Chords, Major, Minor, Diminshed, Augmented

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on April 22, 2015

pianomother

http://www.pianomother.com/Piano_Chor… This lesson shows you how to build or construct a piano chord using a few formulas. You no longer need to memorize the structure of each piano chord. All you need to know is the formula associated with each type of chords. We will discuss major chord, minor chord, diminished chord and augmented chord in this lesson.

Bach: “Air on the G String” Harmonic Analysis

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on April 5, 2015

HOW MUSIC WORKS

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on March 29, 2015

Melody

Rhythm

Rhythm, Accent, Syncopation

Harmony

Bass

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Andrew Wasson – Layering 3 Note Harmony – Music Theory

Posted in Music Theory by Higher Density Blog on March 27, 2015

Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio answers a viewers question…

Q: I like the sounds of having multiple guitar parts played in a harmony. I understand how to make a two-part harmony with one melody getting another interval on it (mostly just by 3rd’s). But, I’d like to know how things could work if there were three parts. Could you make a lesson covering how three guitar parts could be performed together harmonized?
Ken – Kula, HI. USA

A: The most common 3-part harmonies involve the Root, third and the fifth of each scale tone (as we would relate them to the key signature). Another way is to expand upon an existing harmony and take the tones out further from the; 5th, up through the 7th and the 9th. Another idea for doing this work, would be to create layers of different melodies that operate against a foundational line and remain within the key signature, (but do not follow one particular interval across each of the melody tones). This is more complex, but with the information in this lesson you should be able to have some initial success.

Leonard Bernstein – Young People’s Concerts – What is a Mode?

Posted in Modes, Music Theory, Presentation by Higher Density Blog on March 25, 2015

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