Jazz Piano Comping

October 4, 2015

weeklypiano

Bill Hilton

Jerry’s Guitar Bar

Berklee Online

Educator.com

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“Orchestration Percussion” | Music Composition with Educator.com
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Noah Kellman

Quail Studios Tutorials

Fingerpicking 101 – Guitar Lesson
In this video you are taught a great way to fingerpick.
This is a style that I have developed over the years that incorporates classical technique. I use this method on bass guitar as well.

0:12 Right hand only
0:22 how to start, no nails
0:48 How to place your right hand
1:17 Start with the E minor chord
1:40 Your first exercise, Right Hand only
2:06 Three things to think about
2:38 Set, Pluck, Relax
4:23 Problems if you don’t “Set, Pluck, Relax”
5:32 Where to pluck from, which knuckles?
6:09 Why wrist position is important
6:33 Power in fingerpicking = volume
7:10 P I M A (thumb) (index) (middle) (ring), right hand directions
7:26 Left hand finger numbers 1, 2, 3, 4
7:33 Little finger
8:11 How PIMA looks on tab
8:27 Review
8:41 Example of when the wrist needs to be low
9:21 Example of fingerpicking position on Dust In The Wind intro

GuitarLessons365

http://www.guitarlessons365.com/class…

Grab the FREE Tab for this lesson in the link above!

In these two video guitar lessons I will demonstrate classical style harmonics for guitar. This harmonic technique is extremely useful no matter what style of music you play.

The first video lesson below demonstrates the basics of how the technique is performed on the guitar. Don’t worry about what type of guitar you are practicing these lessons with. I am using a classical guitar but this technique can be played on any acoustic or electric guitar.

In this first lesson all we are trying to accomplish is sounding a solid harmonic note with a constant bass pedal underneath. This alone can be very challenging in the beginning.

I personally use my picking hand little finger to pluck the harmonic because I feel that it is not only stronger than the ring finger, but the added distance between the little finger and the index finger (which is playing over the harmonic node point) helps the harmonic sound louder. But, if you feel your ring finger feels more secure feel free to use that finger instead. The majority of guitar players actually prefer to use their ring finger.

In this second lesson I will demonstrate how to take this technique to a whole new level by playing an upper melody using the harmonics and a fingerstyle chord progression underneath it. This sounds amazing when it all comes together and can be taken to great heights if practiced sufficiently.

The key here is to keep anything that is not a harmonic in an accompaniment role only. The harmonics will have a difficult time sounding over the natural notes if the natural notes are played to heavily. This isn’t a technique that is usually performed in a loud passage for that very reason.

Take your time and make sure that the harmonics in the first video lesson are solid before attempting the second video lesson. The second video lesson is much more difficult since you have to think about both hands simultaneously in a much more complex fashion than in the first lesson.

There are many popular classical guitar pieces that employ this technique. But even if classical guitar isn’t really your thing, I think you can easily see how useful this technique can be is used with a little bit of imagination.

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 “Intro to Composition” | Music Composition with Educator.com

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Learn the ins and outs of Music Composition with Educator.com’s awesome hand-picked instructors.

More features you’ll see on Educator.com:
-Full lessons complete with extra examples, downloads, and quizzes
-Searchable and jumpable topics to save you time
-Ability to ask questions to instructor and other students

More subjects including:
Music Theory ► http://educator.com/music-theory/ryan/
Music History ► http://educator.com/music-theory/musi…
AP Music Theory ► http://educator.com/music-theory/ap-m…

Our Music Composition Playlist ►
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jazzheavendotcom

Go to http://jazzheaven.com/jerry3 for more FREE Jerry Bergonzi Videos! This was an excerpt from Jerry Bergonzi How to Play Jazz Excercises Video/DVD entitled “Creating a Jazz Vocabulary”, also feat. Brian Levy (sax/piano).
Jam-packed Jazz Improvisation Lessons: 2h Lesson, 60-min Interview, Performances, Play-Along MP3s, PDFs and lots MORE.

A master jazz saxophonist AND master jazz improvisation teacher!
A rare combination, indeed.

Click on http://jazzheaven.com – other killer jazz improvisation instructional videos for all instruments with Kenny Werner, Jean-Michel Pilc, Walt Weiskopf, Vince Herring, Lee Konitz and MORE.
(Plus jazz instructional videos with MANY other great jazz artists like Oz Noy, Eric Harland, Ralph Peterson, Ari Hoenig, Lage Lund, Gilad Hekselman, Ingrid Jensen, Geoffrey Keezer, Enrico Pieranunzi & more.)

Go to http://jazzheaven.com to check out many more How to Play Jazz Exercises & Lessons!

Bill Hilton

http://bit.ly/billsbook

Last week I explained that playing blues in keys that are normally considered more difficult (such as E, A and D) can actually be easier than playing blues in C. This is because there are fewer black notes in the basic blues scales of the more ‘difficult’ keys than in the blues scale of C.

However, it’s important to remember that playing in a different key will affect which crush notes you play. Crush notes are usually a slide from a black note to a white note. You can slide from white to black, or white to white, but this is a bit more unusual – crush notes are as much of a rhythmic effect as a melodic one and it’s hard to get an ‘edgy’ sound when crushing up from white to black.

In the key of C, I tend to crush from notes in the blues scale to notes in the pentatonic scale, to make what I call an extended blues scale. However, with a key with fewer black notes in the blues scale, such as the keys I mentioned last week, it’s necessary to change things around a little bit.

It’s not too difficult to do this, because you can actually crush from notes that are not in either of the scales that you’re focusing on. For example, when playing in E I will often use D sharp as a crush note. Even though D sharp is a major seventh in E and normally wouldn’t work when playing blues — it sounds a little too jazzy – it works as a crush note because people will only hear the E.

Remember that blues in E shouldn’t be simply a transposition of blues in C. Different patterns and licks will fall under your hands, and licks that work in one key might not work in another.

The best way to get used to playing the blues in any key is to practise. Have a go and see what different sounds you can come up with using different crush notes.

If you’re interested in learning more about blues, jazz or pop piano, you might be interested in my book, How to Really Play the Piano, which teaches improvisation through the medium of 12-bar blues and has loads of information on chords and harmony.

jazzheavendotcom

Go to http://jazzheaven.com/jerry3 for more FREE Jerry Bergonzi Videos! This was an excerpt from Jerry Bergonzi How to Play Jazz Excercises Video/DVD entitled “Creating a Jazz Vocabulary”, also feat. Brian Levy (sax/piano).
Jam-packed Jazz Improvisation Lessons: 2h Lesson, 60-min Interview, Performances, Play-Along MP3s, PDFs and lots MORE.

A master jazz saxophonist AND master jazz improvisation teacher!
A rare combination, indeed.

Click on http://jazzheaven.com – other killer jazz improvisation instructional videos for all instruments with Kenny Werner, Jean-Michel Pilc, Walt Weiskopf, Vince Herring, Lee Konitz and MORE.
(Plus jazz instructional videos with MANY other great jazz artists like Oz Noy, Eric Harland, Ralph Peterson, Ari Hoenig, Lage Lund, Gilad Hekselman, Ingrid Jensen, Geoffrey Keezer, Enrico Pieranunzi & more.)

Go to http://jazzheaven.com to check out many more How to Play Jazz Exercises & Lessons!

Tenor saxophonist, Jerry Bergonzi, is an internationally recognized jazz performer, composer, author and educator. His music is renowned for its innovation, mastery, and integrity. Relentless drive, inner fire, total command, awesome technique, elastic lyricism, rich resonance, world-class, a musical visionary, are among the rave reviews credited to his sound. Bergonzi’s music has been applauded throughout the world at festivals, concert halls, and jazz venues and his dedication to jazz music has been well documented by an extensive discography. The Italian label, Red Records, was Bergonzi’s greatest supporter. “Red Records was the first label that really believed in my music.” says Jerry. They released four CD’s with Bergonzi as the leader, including, Lineage, a live recording featuring Mulgrew Miller, Dave Santoro, and Adam Nussbaum. Jerry later played with the Red Record all-stars including Kenny Barron, and Bobby Watson, as well as on a number of other Red releases with Salvatore Tranchini, Fred Hersch, and Alex Riel. He has also performed and recorded with the George Gruntz Big Band, the Gil Evans Orchestra (Miles Davis in Montreaux), and 12 Jazz Visits in Copenhagan for Stunt Records. The Riel Deal, on Stunt, featured drummer Alex Riel, Kenny Werner and Jesper Lundgaard, and was awarded a Grammy in Denmark for best jazz recording in 1997. An association with Daniel Humair and the late J.F.Jenny Clark yielded a number of recordings for the French, Label Bleu. One of which was Bergonzi’s CD, Global Summit, it featured Tiger Okoshi, Joachim Kuhn, Daniel Humair and Dave Santoro. This was the product of one of three National Endowments awarded Bergonzi. Another project with pianist Kuhn won the accolade Best Jazz Album in France 1992. Among the many other artists that Bergonzi has performed and recorded with are; John Abercrombie, Nando Michelin, Antonio Farao, Bill Evans (with the National Jazz Ensemble), Joe D’Orio, Eddie Gomez, Miroslaz Vitous, George Mraz, Billy Hart, Andy Laverne, Steve Swallow, Hal Galper, Roy Haynes, Charlie Mariano, Bob Cranshaw, Ray Drummond, Billy Drummond, Danny Richmond, Danny Gottlieb, Dave Holland, Jack DeJonette, Paul Desmond, Bennie Wallace, Gerry Mulligan, Hal Crook, Herb Pomeroy, Mike Manieri, Mark Johnson, Michel Portal, Marcel Solal, Pat Martino, Franco Ambrosetti, and many more. The Double-Time Records label has released most of Bergonzi’s recent work. Just Within, Lost in the Shuffle, Wiggy, and A Different Look, were recorded by Bergonzi’s burning organ trio, with Dan Wall and Adam Nussbaum. Also on Double-Time, The Dave Santoro Standard recordings feature Bergonzi’s swinging tenor along with drummer Tom Melito and pianists Bruce Barth and Renato Chicco. As a band leader, Bergonzi has performed worldwide at the Red Sea, San Remo, Moomba, and North Sea Jazz festivals, to name a few. He has appeared at the World Saxophone Congress in Montreal, Canada and Valencia, Spain with fellow saxophonist Philippe Geiss. Bergonzi’s performance at the Subway in Cologne has been featured on the German TV series, Round Midnight. His quartet performs at Duc de Lombarde in Paris, the Fasching in Stockholm, the Jazz House in Copenhagan, and the Bird’s Eye in Basel, and many others. Today, Bergonzi makes his home in Boston area with his wife and two children. He continues to teach and perform worldwide. He endorses Selmer Saxophones, Rico Reeds and Zildjian Cymbals. “This guy is the real tower of power…..His bold penetrating tone and furiously paced streams of notes make for a commanding voice indeed. His passionate improvisations are marked by a consistency of strength in every register and a penchant for harmonic development.” Bill Milkowski Downbeat Review

Hope you enjoyed this Jazz Improvisation Lesson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0L8DN…

jazz2511

‘Let’s Fall In Love’ – Jazz piano Tutorial. To see the notation and comments clearly, watch it in HD mode.
Another great standard – this one by Harold Arlen. It begins as solo piano played freely, and then at an easy tempo with bass and drums (courtesy of that great program ‘Real Tracks’ from PG Music). I like the version by Dianna Krall live in Rio, which takes the song at an easy tempo.
This was played from a standard simple lead sheet (Sher Music’s ‘New Real Book – Volume 2’), but I altered a lot of the chords on the way! That simple I,vii,ii,V progression (in C – Cmaj7, Am7, Dm7, G7) can be altered in so many different ways!
The video is free to download on my website – http://www.bushgrafts.com
The printable transcription and backing track will be on my DVD, or can be bought for $1.20. Details are on my website

Jazz Video Guy

Richard DeRosa, who teaches jazz composition and arranging at the University of North Texas, has arranged and conducted music for Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra. Other arrangements have been recorded by the Mel Lewis, Gerry Mulligan, and Glenn Miller big bands, vocalist Susannah McCorkle,

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Arranging is where a musician prepares and adapts an already written composition for presentation in other than its original form. An arrangement may include reharmonization, paraphrasing, and/or development of a composition, so that it fully represents the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structure. Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety.

Arrangements for small jazz combos are usually informal, minimal, and uncredited. This was particularly so for combos in the bebop era. In general, the larger the ensemble, the greater the need for a formal arrangement, although the early Count Basie big band was famous for its head arrangements, so called because they were worked out by the players themselves, memorized immediately and never written down. Most arrangements for large ensembles, big bands, in the swing era, were written down, however, and credited to a specific arranger, as were later arrangements for the Count Basie big band by Sammy Nestico and Neal Hefti. Don Redman made significant innovations in the pattern of arrangement in Fletcher Henderson’s orchestra in the 1920s. He introduced the pattern of arranging melodies in the body of arrangements and arranging section performances of the big band. Benny Carter became Fletcher’s main arranger in the early 30’s, moving on become as famous for his arranging expertise as his musicianship. Billy Strayhorn was an arranger of great renown in the Duke Ellington orchestra beginning in 1938.
Jelly Roll Morton is considered the earliest jazz arranger, writing down the parts when he was touring about 1912-1915 so that pick-up bands could play his compositions. Big band arrangements are informally called charts. In the swing era they were usually either arrangements of popular songs or they were entirely new compositions. Duke Ellington’s and Billy Strayhorn’s arrangements for the Duke Ellington big band were usually new compositions, and some of Eddie Sauter’s arrangements for the Benny Goodman band and Artie Shaw’s arrangements for his own band were new compositions as well. It became more common to arrange sketchy jazz combo compositions for big band after the bop era.
After 1950, the big band trend declined in number. However, several bands continued and arrangers provided renowned arrangements. Gil Evans wrote a number of large-ensemble arrangements in the late fifties and early sixties intended for recording sessions only. Other arrangers of note include Vic Schoen, Pete Rugolo, Oliver Nelson, Johnny Richards, Billy May, Thad Jones, Maria Schneider, Bob Brookmeyer, Steve Sample, Sr, Lou Marini, Nelson Riddle, Ralph Burns, Billy Byers, Gordon Jenkins, Ray Conniff, Henry Mancini, Gil Evans, Gordon Goodwin, and Ray Reach.

Flight Of The Bumble Bee  –  Rimsky-korsakoff

Paul Barton

Arranged for Piano by MYRA HESS. PIANO LESSON by Paul Barton on FEURICH 218 harmonic pedal piano.
*Correction at 7:59 – metronome beat should be 60 not 80.

Performance only in overhead keyboard view: http://youtu.be/1JpQkjRN4t8

Please see first up-loader’s comment for English language video dialogue as text as requested for online translators.

Public domain arrangement for piano Harold Bauer from IMSLP Music Library: http://petruccilibrary.ca/linkhandler…

Nathaniel Moore

In this beginner jazz guitar lesson Nathaniel shows you the 12 most essential dominant jazz chords. These are an excellent place to start if you are new to jazz guitar.

Learn these 12 chords and you can play almost any Jazz tune. Sit in with bands at jam sessions, accompany a singer, etc.

Be sure and go to
http://globalcounterpoint.com/wp-cont…

and get your free lesson sheet which has the chord diagrams for each of these chords.

Charlie Porter

NYC Trumpeter, Charlie Porter, demonstrates how to achieve authentic jazz articulation through the use of swing feel, dynamics, slur/tongue combination and cross accents. Part I

Charlie is available for Online Trumpet Lessons via Skype.

Please visit:
http://www.charlieportermusic.com/les…

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Use the link below to check out Jazz Everyone, where you can find free jazz lessons and more!

http://www.jazzeveryone.com/affiliate…

YaleCourses

Listening to Music (MUSI 112)

This lecture explores the basic nature of melody. Touching on historical periods ranging from ancient Greece to the present day, Professor Wright draws examples from musical worlds as disparate as nineteenth-century Europe and twentieth-century India, China, and America. Professor Wright puts forth a historical, technical, and holistic approach to understanding the way pitches and scales work in music. He concludes his lecture by bringing pitch and rhythm together in a discussion of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Nature of Melody
02:37 – Chapter 2. The Development of Notes and the Scale
14:43 – Chapter 3. Major, Minor, and Chromatic Scales in World Music
33:03 – Chapter 4. Pitch and Rhythm in Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony

Adam Edison

For more information, please visit: http://adamedison.com

This video covers an essential part of a composition student’s education – listening to recordings, and analysis of the score. It also covers the basic component’s of every composition student’s education (music theory, listening and analysis, SHMRG, , a very brief discussion about music notation software.