Mike’s Master Classes
http://mikesclass.es/postbebopcomping

Excerpts from Juampy Juarez’s class Post BeBop Comping:Using Clusters and Fourths for a Contemporary Sound, available for download at http://www.mikesmasterclasses.com – Post bebop started around 1959, with new records like “Kind of blue” by Miles Davis, “Jazz of space ages” by George Russell, “Giant Steps” by John Coltrane, and one year after “This is our music” by Ornette Coleman.
These innovative landmark records contain plenty of modal jazz, quartal chords, clusters, and more.
After those great albums, monster musicians like Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter, plus Bill Evans and McCoy Tyner, contributed with new chord ideas and new scales, similar to the ones that contemporary classical composers used at the dawn of the 20th century.
In an easy way, I’m trying to teach you how to use these modern sounds: chords stacked by fourths with the addition of open strings, quintal chords over thirds chords, plus clusters(formed by seconds), and how to apply to simple blues forms, jazz standards and bossa novas. These are my investigations on these areas, based on my experience playing with many greats over the globe.
Today, this material is a must if you want a contemporary , modern sound. No doubt about it.
All the best!
Juampy
This class runs just under an hour and there are 6 written pages in standard notation and TAB

Bill Hilton

Check out my book! http://bit.ly/billsbook.

Here’s a pop piano comping exercise that’s quite fun to play. It’s based on five simple chords (C, Dm, F, G and Am) and a right hand part that just uses the notes C, F and G. It sounds pretty cool and isn’t at all difficult to learn.

Most pop comps you’ll ever play on the piano will be based on fairly simple chord progressions. The only slight hurdle you might have to overcome is making sure you can comp in a variety of difference keys – especially “guitar friendly” keys like E, A, D and G. So once you’ve mastered this sequence in C, try transposing it into some other keys and seeing what you can do.

As with all piano techniques, the trick here is to play over and over again until this stuff just falls under your fingers without you even having to think about it. You need to get to a point where your fingers are doing the thinking for themselves at the keyboard. When that happens, you’ll find you unconsciously begin to change and develop the exercise until you’re playing comps of your own.

If you’re not sure about the basics of chords and how harmony works on the piano, check out some of my earlier tutorials.

Freejazzlessons.com·61 videos

http://www.freejazzlessons.com/ Free Jazz Piano Lesson on two handed comping chords.

http://www.namm.org http://www.wannaplaymusic.com/ http://www.scottthepianoguy.com/
Scott Houston is called “the Pied Piper of recreational music-making.” On his Emmy Award-winning public television series, The Piano Guy, Scott gives hope to millions of viewers who just want to sit at the piano and play their favorite tunes. Here Scott and his guest, Bobby Floyd, discuss playing the Ray Charles’ hit, Georgia On My Mind.
Follow The Piano Guy on Twitter @pianoguyscott http://twitter.com/pianoguyscott

Bill Hilton·117 videos

Check out my book! http://bit.ly/billsbook.

Here’s a pop piano comping exercise that’s quite fun to play. It’s based on five simple chords (C, Dm, F, G and Am) and a right hand part that just uses the notes C, F and G. It sounds pretty cool and isn’t at all difficult to learn.

Most pop comps you’ll ever play on the piano will be based on fairly simple chord progressions. The only slight hurdle you might have to overcome is making sure you can comp in a variety of difference keys – especially “guitar friendly” keys like E, A, D and G. So once you’ve mastered this sequence in C, try transposing it into some other keys and seeing what you can do.

As with all piano techniques, the trick here is to play over and over again until this stuff just falls under your fingers without you even having to think about it. You need to get to a point where your fingers are doing the thinking for themselves at the keyboard. When that happens, you’ll find you unconsciously begin to change and develop the exercise until you’re playing comps of your own.

If you’re not sure about the basics of chords and how harmony works on the piano, check out some of my earlier tutorials.

BerkleeMusic·349 videos

Berkleemusic’s instructor Bruce Saunders explains how to use jazz chords in your guitar playing.