Composing is always a form of improvisation: with ideas, with musical particles, with imaginary shapes. And it is in this sense that the artistic itinerary and the world-view of the Turkish composer and pianist Fazıl Say should be understood. For it was from the free forms with which he became familiar in the course of his piano lessons with the Cortot pupil Mithat Fenmen that he developed an aesthetic outlook that constitutes the core of his self-conception as a composer. Fazıl Say has been touching audiences and critics alike for more than twenty-five years in a way that has become rare in the increasingly materialistic and elaborately organised classical music world. Concerts with this artist are something else. They are more direct, more open, more exciting; in short, they go straight to the heart. And the same may be said of his compositions.

Fazıl Say wrote his first piece — a piano sonata — as early as 1984, at the age of fourteen, when he was a student at the Conservatory of his home town Ankara. It was followed, in this early phase of his development, by several chamber works without an opus number, including Schwarze Hymnen for violin and piano and a guitar concerto. He subsequently designated as his opus 1 one of the works that he had played in the concert that won him the Young Concert Artists Auditions in New York: the Four Dances of Nasreddin Hodja. This work already displays in essence the significant features of his personal style: a rhapsodic, fantasia-like basic structure; a variable rhythm, often dance-like, though formed through syncopation; a continuous, vital driving pulse; and a wealth of melodic ideas that may often be traced back to themes from the folk music of Turkey and its neighbours. In these respects, Fazıl Say stands to some extent in the tradition of composers like Béla Bartók, George Enescu, and György Ligeti, who also drew on the rich musical folklore of their countries. He attracted international attention with the piano piece Black Earth (1997), in which he employs techniques familiar to us from John Cage and his works for prepared piano.

After this, Say increasingly turned to the large orchestral forms. Taking his inspiration from the poetry (and the biographies) of the writers Nâzım Hikmet and Metin Altıok, he composed works for soloists, chorus and orchestra which, especially in the case of the oratorio Nâzim, clearly take up the tradition of composers such as Carl Orff. In addition to the modern European instrumentarium, Say also makes frequent and deliberate use in these compositions of instruments from his native Turkey, including kudüm and darbuka drums and the ney reed flute. This gives the music a colouring that sets it apart from many comparable creations in this genre. In the year 2007 he aroused international interest with his Violin Concerto 1001 Nights in the Harem, which is based on the celebrated tales of the same name, but deals specifically with the fate of seven women from a harem. Since its world premiere by Patricia Kopatchinskaja, the piece has already received further performances in many international concert halls.

Fazıl Say scored a further great success with his first symphony, the Istanbul Symphony, premiered in 2010 at the conclusion of his five-year residency at the Konzerthaus Dortmund. Jointly commissioned by the WDR and the Konzerthaus Dortmund in the framework of Ruhr.2010, the work constitutes a vibrant and poetic tribute to the metropolis on the Bosporus and its millions of inhabitants. The same year saw the composition, among other pieces, of his Divorce String Quartet (based on atonal principles), and commissioned works like the Piano Concerto Nirvana Burning for the Salzburg Festival and a Trumpet Concerto for the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival, premiered by Gábor Boldoczki. In response to a commission from the 2011 Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival, Say has also written a Clarinet Concerto for Sabine Meyer that refers to the life and work of the Persian poet Omar Khayyam; for the Munich Biennale he is working on his first opera, entitled Sivas. Fazıl Say’s works are issued worldwide by the renowned music publishers Schott of Mainz.

How To Master Your Instrument

September 13, 2015

Art of Composing

OrchestrationOnline

Ariel Lanyi

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https://www.facebook.com/ArielFans
Liszt’s Sonata in B minor, written in 1853 and published in 1854, is widely considered to be one of Liszt’s supreme works. A work in one movement containing three large sections, it was structurally unique at its time. Most of the thematic material of the piece appears in the opening bars and transforms as the piece unfolds. I hear in Liszt’s Sonata in B minor a colorful variety of writing: numerous pianistic passages intertwined with lyrical operatic sections and orchestra-like writing throughout the sonata. Performing the sonata is a “tour de force” because of its scope, its great musical content, and its technical challenges.
One-take studio recording performed at the Eden-Tamir Music Center, in Jerusalem, Israel.

pianomother

René Puchinger

Educator.com

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 “Intro to Composition” | Music Composition with Educator.com

►Watch more at http://educator.com/music-theory/musi…

Learn the ins and outs of Music Composition with Educator.com’s awesome hand-picked instructors.

More features you’ll see on Educator.com:
-Full lessons complete with extra examples, downloads, and quizzes
-Searchable and jumpable topics to save you time
-Ability to ask questions to instructor and other students

More subjects including:
Music Theory ► http://educator.com/music-theory/ryan/
Music History ► http://educator.com/music-theory/musi…
AP Music Theory ► http://educator.com/music-theory/ap-m…

Our Music Composition Playlist ►
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

NOTE:  Creative Process:  This ensemble creates an ethereal, floating awareness. Some techniques  –  Layers of sound,  drone tones, Using voice sa an instrument, Melodic Fragments, Bending of Notes, repeated bass notes set off a body vibration, increasing division of beat for repeated notes, gradual increase of melodic dialogue  –  Can you identify other creation devices and musical events?  Exercise your deep listening skills.

synoneiro·774 videos

Jez Creek – iPad, iPod Touch, Bugbrand Boardweevil, Korg Monotron
James Lynch – Korg MicroSampler, Kaossilator Pro
Ola Szmidt – vocals, Loopstation, effects
Jim Tetlow – laptop with keyboard, cajón
Chris Conway

 

Adam Edison

For more information, please visit: http://adamedison.com

This video covers an essential part of a composition student’s education – listening to recordings, and analysis of the score. It also covers the basic component’s of every composition student’s education (music theory, listening and analysis, SHMRG, , a very brief discussion about music notation software.

artofcomposing

http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com
http://www.artofcomposing.com

Learn how to compose music, from start to finish.

Be sure to sign up at http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com or http://www.artofcomposing.com to get the full benefits of the course including summaries of all the lessons, worksheets and additional videos.

In this course, you’ll learn about melody, harmony, form, accompaniment, dynamics, articulations and how to make your music generally sound good.

Study the ways in which Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven all made their music work.

Lesson 1 – How to Write a Melody – Learn about how to write a Basic Idea, the real building block of classical music. The easiest way you’ve ever seen, to write a convincing melody.

Lesson 2 – Harmony 101 – Learn about harmony, and how to make the basic idea you wrote in lesson 1, fit to different harmonies.

Lesson 3 – The Musical Period – Learn about the musical period, the first of the small theme types that classical composers use in their music.

Lesson 4 – The Musical Sentence – Learn about the musical sentence, the second of the small theme types that classical composers use in their music.

Lesson 5 – Functional Harmony – Start to get in depth with your knowledge of harmony. Find out what you’ve been missing that will make writing chord progressions easier than ever.

Lesson 6 – Harmonic Progressions and Chromaticism – Learn even more about how to use harmony to get the effects you want in your music. Learn about the different types of chord progressions, sequences and how to easily use chromatic harmony.

Lesson 7 – Your First Complete Piece – Learn about small ternary form, and how all the previous lessons fit together to create a complete piece of music.

Lesson 8 – The Details – Learn how to use your accompaniment, articulations and dynamics to create a great sounding, convincing piece of classical music.

Be sure to sign up at http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com or http://www.artofcomposing.com to get the full benefits of the course including summaries of all the lessons, worksheets and additional videos.

artofcomposing

http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com
http://www.artofcomposing.com

Learn how to compose music, from start to finish.

Be sure to sign up at http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com or http://www.artofcomposing.com to get the full benefits of the course including summaries of all the lessons, worksheets and additional videos.

In this course, you’ll learn about melody, harmony, form, accompaniment, dynamics, articulations and how to make your music generally sound good.

Study the ways in which Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven all made their music work.

Lesson 1 – How to Write a Melody – Learn about how to write a Basic Idea, the real building block of classical music. The easiest way you’ve ever seen, to write a convincing melody.

Lesson 2 – Harmony 101 – Learn about harmony, and how to make the basic idea you wrote in lesson 1, fit to different harmonies.

Lesson 3 – The Musical Period – Learn about the musical period, the first of the small theme types that classical composers use in their music.

Lesson 4 – The Musical Sentence – Learn about the musical sentence, the second of the small theme types that classical composers use in their music.

Lesson 5 – Functional Harmony – Start to get in depth with your knowledge of harmony. Find out what you’ve been missing that will make writing chord progressions easier than ever.

Lesson 6 – Harmonic Progressions and Chromaticism – Learn even more about how to use harmony to get the effects you want in your music. Learn about the different types of chord progressions, sequences and how to easily use chromatic harmony.

Lesson 7 – Your First Complete Piece – Learn about small ternary form, and how all the previous lessons fit together to create a complete piece of music.

Lesson 8 – The Details – Learn how to use your accompaniment, articulations and dynamics to create a great sounding, convincing piece of classical music.

Be sure to sign up at http://www.howtocomposemusic101.com or http://www.artofcomposing.com to get the full benefits of the course including summaries of all the lessons, worksheets and additional videos.

THEMCCARTNEYCHANNEL

The genius of Sir Paul McCartney.
Track listing

All pieces by Paul McCartney
Movement I – After heavy light years
1.”Fire/Rain” Allegro energico — 4:30
2.”Cell Growth” Semplice — 8:30
3.”‘Human’ Theme” Maestoso — 3:36

Movement II – He awoke startled
1.”Meditation” Contemplativo — 3:57
2.”Crystal Ship” Con moto scherzando — 2:02
3.”Sea Voyage” Pulsating, with cool jazz feel — 3:39
4.”Lost At Sea” Sognando — 4:37
5.”Release” Allegro con spirito — 1:54

Movement III – Subtle colours merged soft contours
1.”Safe Haven/Standing Stone” Pastorale con moto — 4:11
2.”Peaceful moment” Andante tranquillo — 2:09
3.”Messenger” Energico — 3:35
4.”Lament” Lamentoso — 2:26
5.”Trance” Misterioso — 5:32
6.”Eclipse” Eroico — 4:57

Movement IV – Strings pluck, horns blow, drums beat
1.”Glory Tales” Trionfale — 2:40
2.”Fugal Celebration” L’istesso tempo. Fresco — 4:25
3.”Rustic Dance” Rustico — 2:00
4.”Love Duet” Andante intimo — 3:43
5.”Celebration” Andante — 6:15

Released
23 September 1997
Recorded
30 April – 2 May 1997
Classical
Length
74:46
Producer
John Fraser
Paul McCartney’s Standing Stone – which was well-received – reached #1 on the classical charts.
I also have the original Christmas day broadcast of the concert on ch 5 on VHS with Paul and Linda attending,maybe someday I`ll convert and upload too.

iconic

Paul McCartney talking about classical music and composing.

Victoria Williams

This video accompanies the lesson on how to compose a minor pentatonic piece here http://blog.mymusictheory.com/2014/ho…

A pentatonic piece is built on just five different notes. A minor pentatonic scale uses the notes D, F, G, A and C (or those notes transposed to another key), and the keynote is D.

It’s really simple to compose a piece based on the minor pentatonic scale, because all the notes blend together harmoniously. It doesn’t matter which note of the minor pentatonic scale you write against another, it will always sound pleasant, with no harsh clashes or dissonances.

To make an effective pentatonic composition, use a nice combination of instruments and focus on using a variety of rhythms. Use cross rhythms (syncopation) for an interesting effect.

thinkspaceeducation

Due to a fantastic reception of our previous video we return this week with another special interview with Harry Gregson-Williams in which he discusses his composing process, his advice for a uncredited budding composer and a few anecdotes.

Go to http://www.thinkspaceonline.co.uk for more free tutorials, information and free sample units on our courses in film scoring, orchestration and composition.

If you enjoyed this video, please like and share it with anyone you think will find it useful. For weekly videos like this every Tuesday, subscribe to this channel.

Download a FREE Music For The Media Sample Unit Here: http://signup.thinkspaceonline.co.uk/…

Download a FREE Cinematic Orchestration Sample Unit Here: http://signup.thinkspaceonline.co.uk/..

icouldstories

Visit http://icould.com/videos/suzanne-p-2/ for more careers info.

Suzanne P is a Composer doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh. Despite being told by a teacher at school that she would never make it, she says “I am a musician, there was never anything else”.Highlights at http://icould.com/videos/suzanne-p-2/…