DCGraf1

INFINITY SHOW

The special guest of “Consultant plus”
The Best Russian Electric String Quartet,
infinity-show@mail.ru. For contacts +7 915 0777715 Anna.
Arranger by Karen Gasparyan

junco fukada

 

The Daily Beethoven

(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels)

I. Adagio molto — Allegro con brio @0:00
II. Larghetto (A major) @9:30
III. Scherzo. Allegro — Trio @19:53
IV. Allegro molto @23:12

Conducted by Rene Leibowitz / Royal Philharmonic

For a more detailed analysis with live performance, check out this link:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/symp…

Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer.

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…

Introduction to Sonata Form:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/abou…

University of California Television (UCTV)

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Cecil Lytle, Professor of Music and Provost, explores Beethoven’s use of the sonata – his development and early influences. He also performs Beethoven’s first sonata for piano. [1/1997] [Humanities] [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 1297 ]

The Daily Beethoven

Leif Ove Andsnes

An In-depth focus on Beethoven’s Piano Concertos with Leif Ove Andsnes
By Phil Grabsky, Seventh Art Productions

  • Music

    • “Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 5 in E-Flat Major, Op. 73: II. Adagio un poco moto – attacca” by Leif Ove Andsnes ( • )

The Daily Beethoven

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(Make sure “Annotations” is ON to see section labels)

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (1806)
I.Allegro ma non troppo (D major) @0:00
II.Larghetto (G major) @23:06
III.Rondo. Allegro (D major) @32:53

Violin: Julia Fischer
BBC Symphony Orchestra
David Zinman. conductor

This analysis was derived in part from Graham Williams’ short Mayflower guide to Op.61.

Note: at this time the annotations will not appear on mobile devices, so if possible please watch from a computer.

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven’s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/colo…

smalin

mugge62

Beethoven’s 5th Piano concert (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim
Det kongelige kapel – Michael Schønvandt i Danmarks Radio Koncerthuset 2009 ved prisoverrækkelsen af Sonningprisen 2009 på 600,000 DKK ~ 125.000 US$ ~ The Sonning Prize Award! The copyright © owner to all content in this video with The Royal Orchestra & Daniel Barenboim conducted by Michael Schønwandt, is entirely Danmarks Radio!
Also listen to Barenboims version of Noctune op. 27 no 2 by Chopin: http://www.youtube.com//watch?v=7EcER…

University of California Television (UCTV)

Cecil Lytle, Professor of Music and Provost, explores Beethoven’s use of the sonata – his development and early influences. He also performs Beethoven’s first sonata for piano. [1/1997] [Humanities] [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 1297 ]

Prom 13: Beethoven Cycle — Symphonies Nos. 7 & 8
Beethoven – Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92
1 – Poco sostenuto — Vivace
2 – Allegretto
3 – Presto — Assai meno presto (trio)
4 – Allegro con brio

West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
Daniel Barenboim, conductor
Royal Albert Hall, 24 July 2012

DrDave2701

Recently Bashar advised us that the music chords played in the first 3 minutes of Beethoven’s Symphony #7, 2nd Movement, are exactly and precisely what will tap into the idea, of healing and our letting go of the past, sorrow, grief, regret, and the forgiving of ourselves. This clip includes the entire Beethoven Symphony #7 2nd Movement.

yuta hashimoto

Ludwig van Beethoven
Opus 21: Symphony No. 1 in C major (00:00)
First (00:00) Second (08:14) Third (14:15) Fourth (17:45)

Opus 36: Symphony No. 2 in D major (23:48)
First (23:48) Second (33:48) Third (45:54) Fourth (49:15)

Opus 55: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major “Eroica” (56:08)
First (56:08) Second (1:10:23) Third (1:26:06) Fourth (1:31:42)

Opus 60: Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major (1:42:48)
First (1:42:48) Second (1:54:29) Third (2:03:50) Fourth (2:09:18)

Opus 67: Symphony No. 5 in C minor (2:16:23)
First (2:16:23) Second (2:23:57) Third (2:33:40) Fourth (2:38:51)

Opus 68: Symphony No. 6 in F major “Pastoral” (2:47:21)
First (2:47:21) Second (2:56:44) Third (3:09:18) Fourth (3:14:17) Fifth (3:17:51)

Opus 92: Symphony No. 7 in A major (3:26:37)
First (3:26:37) Second (3:38:07) Third (3:46:02) Fourth (3:53:24)

Opus 93: Symphony No. 8 in F major (4:00:22)
First (4:00:22) Second (4:09:34) Third (4:13:26) Fourth (4:18:25)

Opus 125: Symphony No. 9 in D minor “Choral” (4:26:17)
First (4:26:17) Second (4:41:14) Third (4:52:29) Fourth (5:08:42)

Pakito Palote

 Concierto de la Orquesta Sinfónica Juvenil Simón Bolívar

dirigida por Gustavo Dudamel
en el Festival Beethoven de Bonn de 2007.

Ludwig van Beethoven (Bonn, 1770 – Viena, 1827)
Sinfonía Nº 3 en Mi bemol mayor, Opus 55, Heroica.
[00,01~] 1. Allegro con brio
[14,35~] 2. Marcia funebre (Adagio assai)
[32,20~] 3. Scherzo (Allegro)
[36,50~] 4. Finale (Allegro molto-Poco andante-Presto)

José Pablo Moncayo García
(Guadalajara, Jalisco, 1912 – Ciudad de México, 1958)
[50,04~] Huapango

Alberto Evaristo Ginastera
(Barracas, Buenos Aires, 1916 – Ginebra, 1983)
Cuatro danzas del ballet Estancia, Opus 8a/b (1941)
[59,07~] Danza final. Malambo

Orquesta Sinfónica Juvenil Simón Bolívar de Venezuela,
Gustavo Dudamel, director.
Concierto celebrado en el Beethovenhalle de Bonn de 2007.

La Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar de Venezuela, OSSBV:
[http://www.fesnojiv.gob.ve/es/sinfoni…]

ollavogala

– Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven (17 December 1770 — 26 March 1827)
– Performers: Takács Quartet
– Year of recording: 2003

String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131, written in 1826.

00:00 – 1. Adagio ma non troppo e molto espressivo
08:03 – 2. Allegro molto vivace
11:00 – 3. Allegro moderato
11:43 – 4. Andante ma non troppo e molto cantabile
25:10 – 5. Presto
30:12 – 6. Adagio quasi un poco andante
32:30 – 7. Allegro

Despite its opus number, this quartet came after the “Fifteenth” Op. 132 from 1825, one of three composed to meet a commission from Prince Nikolai Golitzin. The others were Nos. 12 and 13. Like the Thirteenth and Fifteenth, this C sharp minor Quartet consists of more than the usual three or four movements. There are, in fact, seven movements to this massive work, and its form, as one might suspect, is also most unusual.

The quartet begins with a fugue, marked Adagio ma non troppo e molto espressivo. The mood throughout is somber, but with a religiosity and tenderness that seem to suggest the composer’s sense of his own mortality (Beethoven died in March 1827, a year after this composition). Near the end of this movement the music fades, then leads directly into the second movement, marked Allegro molto vivace, which seems as if it could be a more typical first movement. It begins at a pianissimo level with a theme that might seem more suited to a Rondo finale. A transitional theme appears next, and eventually we arrive at a second subject. The material is reprised but afterward there follows no actual development section. Instead, an expanded coda develops the transitional theme. At this juncture, the traditional sonata-allegro form seems obscured.

The third movement begins without pause, and actually serves as a brief interlude to the long slow movement, which is marked Andante ma non troppo e molto cantabile. It consists of a theme and six variations, most of which involve harmony rather than the essence of the melody itself. This movement is one of the most profound and complex Beethoven ever fashioned in the chamber genre. Each variation is played in a different tempo, thus creating a true “variety” that, to some ears, may seem at first to impart a disjointed quality. Yet, Beethoven’s invention and cleverness are present everywhere. The fifth variation, for instance, with its deftly-wrought syncopation, is wonderfully mysterious and the coda slyly starts off as if it will become yet another variation, but it subtly returns to the main themes, then brings the movement to a close with a gentle fade.

The Presto fifth movement is brimming with energy and charm. It is an attractive, humorous Scherzo with a trio section and may be, despite a few innovative touches by Beethoven, the most traditional of the movements comprising this quartet. Its rather abrupt and harsh ending leads to a brief interlude-like Adagio quasi un poco andante. The sixth movement, like the third, is very brief.

The finale begins with a gruff theme, that is immediately followed by a less fierce but darker theme. A third melody is introduced shortly afterward, closer in character to the last, but expressing sadness and melancholy. The themes reappear, with the form thus far seeming to suggest the movement could be a Rondo. But Beethoven veers toward thematic development, as if to say he has finally found his way to the sonata-allegro form. There follows a recapitulation but with many highly imaginative changes in the previous material. A powerful and tragic coda closes what many consider Beethoven’s greatest quartet. It was first published in Mainz in 1827 and was dedicated to Baron Joseph von Stutterheim.

KVDiveyev

Л. Ван Бетховен. Симфония №5 до минор, op. 67 в транскрипции для фортепиано Ференца Листа
часть 1, Allegro con brio

Концерт цикла Международного фестиваля искусств “Арт-ноябрь”
“Людвиг ван Бетховен. Все симфонии в транскрипции для фортепиано Ференца Листа”
Камерный зал Московского международного дома Музыки.
исполняет Кристофер Тейлор (США)

Art-November 2012
Christopher Taylor
Chamber hall of Moscow International Music House